You The Jury - Netflix

Fox's You The Jury, which the network says is not connected to the NBC/Dick Wolf series, will tackle cases — only civil, no criminal — that address hot-button issues such as online trolling, the limits of free speech, and the constitutional clash of gay rights with religious freedom. It will feature prosecution and defense teams that include attorneys Jose Baez, who defended Casey Anthony; Benjamin Crump, who sought justice for Trayvon Martin; celebrity attorney Joseph Tacopina; as well as Areva Martin, Mike Cavalluzzi and Charla Aldous. They will question and cross-examine the litigants and expert witnesses, as they present their arguments to America and former judge of the Superior Court of California LaDoris Cordell. The closing arguments will be presented by the plaintiff and the defendant as they sit across from one another.

You The Jury - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-04-07

You The Jury - Rodney Alcala - Netflix

Rodney James Alcala (born Rodrigo Jacques Alcala Buquor; August 23, 1943) is an American convicted rapist and serial killer. He was sentenced to death in California in 2010 for five murders committed in that state between 1977 and 1979. In 2013, he received an additional sentence of 25 years to life after pleading guilty to two homicides committed in New York in 1971 and 1977. His true victim count remains unknown, and could be much higher. Prosecutors said that Alcala “toyed” with his victims, strangling them until they lost consciousness, then waiting until they revived, sometimes repeating this process several times before finally killing them. One police detective described Alcala as “a killing machine”, and others have compared him to Ted Bundy. Alcala compiled a collection of more than 1,000 photographs of women and teenage boys, many in sexually explicit poses. In 2016, he was charged with the 1977 murder of a woman identified in one of his photos. He is known to have assaulted one other photographic subject, and police have speculated that others could be rape or murder victims as well. He is sometimes called the “Dating Game Killer” because of his 1978 appearance on the television show The Dating Game in the midst of his murder spree.

You The Jury - Third (joined) trial - Netflix

In 2003 prosecutors entered a motion to join the Samsoe charges with those of the four newly discovered victims. Alcala's attorneys contested it; as one of them explained, “If you're a juror and you hear one murder case, you may be able to have reasonable doubt. But it's very hard to say you have reasonable doubt on all five, especially when four of the five aren't alleged by eyewitnesses but are proven by DNA matches.” In 2006, the California Supreme Court ruled in the prosecution's favor, and in February 2010 Alcala stood trial on the five joined charges. For the third trial Alcala elected to act as his own attorney. He took the stand in his own defense, and for five hours played the roles of both interrogator and witness, asking himself questions (addressing himself as “Mr. Alcala” in a deeper-than-normal voice), and then answering them. During this bizarre self-questioning and answering session he told jurors, often in a rambling monotone, that he was at Knott's Berry Farm applying for a job as a photographer at the time Samsoe was kidnapped. He showed the jury a portion of his 1978 appearance on The Dating Game in an attempt to prove that the earrings found in his Seattle locker were his, not Samsoe's. Jed Mills, the actor who competed against Alcala on the show, told a reporter that earrings were not yet a socially acceptable accoutrement for men in 1978. “I had never seen a man with an earring in his ear”, he said. “I would have noticed them on him”. Alcala made no significant attempt to dispute the four added charges, other than to assert that he could not remember killing any of the women. As part of his closing argument, he played the Arlo Guthrie song “Alice's Restaurant” in which the protagonist tells a psychiatrist that he wants to “kill”. After less than two days' deliberation the jury convicted him on all five counts of first-degree murder. A surprise witness during the penalty phase of the trial was Tali Shapiro, Alcala's first known victim. Psychiatrist Richard Rappaport, the only defense witness, testified that Alcala's borderline personality disorder could explain his testimony that he had no memory of committing the murders. The prosecutor argued that Alcala was a “sexual predator” who “knew what he was doing was wrong and didn't care”. In March 2010 Alcala was sentenced to death for a third time.

You The Jury - References - Netflix