Wannabe - Netflix

Wannabe is the story of unfinished business, one last shot at fame and struggling to let go of a lifelong dream.\ Maxine never made it to the big time as part of teenage girl group Variety and now, as a middle-aged failing music manager, she finds herself in crisis, when the one act she looks after threatens to drop her.\ But Maxine has come up with a plan. A come back. This time bigger, bolder and, well... older. Who cares about a hip young girl group anyway?! What the world is really missing, is Mum Pop

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: None minutes

Premier: None

Wannabe - Wannabe - Netflix

“Wannabe” is the debut single by English girl group Spice Girls. Written and composed by the group members in collaboration with Matt Rowe and Richard “Biffco” Stannard during the group's first professional songwriting session, it was produced by Rowe and Stannard for the group's debut album, Spice, released in November 1996. The song was written, composed, and recorded very quickly; but the result was considered lacklustre by their label, and was sent to be mixed by Dave Way. The group was not pleased with the result, and the recording was mixed again, this time by Mark “Spike” Stent. “Wannabe” is an uptempo dance-pop song which features Mel B and Geri Halliwell rapping. The lyrics, which address the value of female friendship over the heterosexual bond, became an iconic symbol of female empowerment and the most emblematic song of the group's Girl Power philosophy. Despite receiving mixed reviews from music critics, the song won for Best British-Written Single at the 1997 Ivor Novello Awards and for British Single of the Year at the 1997 Brit Awards. “Wannabe” was heavily promoted by the group. Its music video, directed by Johan Camitz, became a big success on the British cable network The Box, which sparked press interest in the group. Subsequently, the song had intensive radio airplay across the United Kingdom, while the group performed it on television programmes and started doing interviews and photo shoots for teen magazines. Responding to the wave of public interest in the group, Virgin released the song as the group's debut single in July 1996, well ahead of the planned release date of the Spice album. “Wannabe” topped the UK Singles Chart for seven weeks and has received a double Platinum certification by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI). In January 1997 it was released in the United States, topping the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks. It was the group's only number-one single in that country. By the end of 1996, “Wannabe” had topped the charts in 22 nations, and by March 1997 this number had climbed to 37. “Wannabe” became the best-selling single by a girl group in the world, with 1,385,211 and 2,910,000 copies sold in United Kingdom (by 2015) and United States (by 2014), respectively, and over 7 million copies worldwide by the end of 1997. In 2014, it was rated as the most easily recognisable pop song of the last 60 years.

Wannabe - Composition - Netflix

“Wannabe” is a dance-pop song with influences of hip hop and rap. Written in the key of B major, it is set in the time signature of common time and moves at a moderate tempo of 110 beats per minute. It uses the sequence B–D–E–A–A♯ as a bass line during the refrain, the chorus, and the bridge, and uses a chord progression of F♯–G♯m–E–B for the verses. The song is constructed in a verse-pre-chorus-chorus form, with a rapped bridge before the third and final chorus. Musically, it is “energised” by a highly syncopated synthesised riff, and by the way the repetitive lyrics and rhythm are highlighted during the bridge. “Wannabe” presents a different version of the traditional pop love song performed by females; its energetic, self-assertive style expresses a confident independence that is not reliant on the male figure for its continuance. The song opens with Brown's laugh, followed by “undislodgeable [sic] piano notes”. Over these notes, the first lines of the refrain are rapped in a call and response interaction between Brown and Halliwell. The words “tell”, “really” and “I wanna” are repeated, so that the vocal tone and lyrics build up an image of female self-assertion. The refrain ends with the word “zigazig-ha”, a euphemism for female desire, which is ambiguously sexualised or broadly economic. The first verse follows; Brown, Halliwell, Chisholm, Bunton sing one line individually, in that order. In this part, the lyrics have a pragmatic sense of control of the situation; they begin, “If you want my future, forget my past.” This, according to musicologist Sheila Whiteley, taps directly into the emotions of the young teenage audience. During the chorus, the lyrics—“If you wanna be my lover/You gotta get with my friends”—address the value of female friendship over the heterosexual bond, while the ascending group of chords and the number of voices creates a sense of power that adds to the song's level of excitement. The same pattern occurs, leading to the second chorus. Towards the end, Brown and Halliwell rap the bridge, which serves as a presentation to each of the girls' personalities. The group repeats the chorus for the last time, ending the song with energetic refrains—“Slam your body down and wind it all around”—and the word “zigazig-ha”.

Wannabe - References - Netflix