Vietnam - Netflix

Vietnam is a stunningly powerful re-enactment of the bitterly controversial issue of Australia's involvement in what was perceived as an American War.Twelve thousand young Australians were conscripted to Vietnam. Five hundred never returned. On television, terrible images of war were impossible to ignore - in the beginning, few voices protested, but as the war worsened and casualties increased things began to change.The arrival of conscription into the lives of ordinary Australians changed families forever, Vietnam tells the story of one such family, the Goddards, a family at war and about to be torn apart.

Vietnam - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 45 minutes

Premier: 1987-02-23

Vietnam - Vietnam Veterans Memorial - Netflix

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a 2-acre (8,000 m²) U.S. national memorial in Washington D.C. It honors service members of the U.S. armed forces who fought in the Vietnam War, service members who died in service in Vietnam/South East Asia, and those service members who were unaccounted for (missing in action, MIA) during the war. Its construction and related issues have been the source of controversies, some of which have resulted in additions to the memorial complex. The memorial currently consists of three separate parts: the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, completed first and the best-known part of the memorial; The Three Soldiers, and the Vietnam Women's Memorial. The main part of the memorial, which was completed in 1982, is in Constitution Gardens adjacent to the National Mall, just northeast of the Lincoln Memorial. The memorial is maintained by the U.S. National Park Service, and receives around 3 million visitors each year. The Memorial Wall was designed by American architect Maya Lin. In 2007, it was ranked tenth on the “List of America's Favorite Architecture” by the American Institute of Architects. As a National Memorial, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Vietnam - Opposition to design and compromise - Netflix

The selected design was very controversial, in particular its unconventional design, its black color and its lack of ornamentation. Some public officials voiced their displeasure, calling the wall “a black gash of shame.” Two prominent early supporters of the project, H. Ross Perot and James Webb, withdrew their support once they saw the design. Said Webb, “I never in my wildest dreams imagined such a nihilistic slab of stone.” James Watt, Secretary of the Interior under President Ronald Reagan, initially refused to issue a building permit for the memorial due to the public outcry about the design. Since its early years, criticism of the Memorial's design faded. In the words of Scruggs, “It has become something of a shrine.” Negative reactions to Maya Lin's design created a controversy; a compromise was reached by commissioning Frederick Hart (who had placed third in the original design competition) to produce a bronze figurative sculpture in the heroic tradition. Opponents of Lin's design had hoped to place this sculpture of three soldiers at the apex of the wall's two sides. Lin objected strenuously to this, arguing that this would make the soldiers the focal point of the memorial, and her wall a mere backdrop. A compromise was reached, and the sculpture was placed off to one side to minimize the impact of the addition on Lin's design. On October 13, 1982, the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts approved the erection of a flagpole to be grouped with sculptures.

Vietnam - References - Netflix