The Sword - Netflix

The sword has influenced the outcome of some of the greatest moments in history, inspired famous myths and legends, and served as a symbol of the fight against evil and oppression. It turned blacksmiths into artisans, soldiers into legends, and actors into swashbuckling heroes. Explore the history of this iconic weapon and its evolution from flint and bone tools of the Stone Age to light saber weapons in space.

The Sword - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

The Sword - Damocles - Netflix

Damocles (; Greek: Δαμοκλῆς, translit. Dāmoklē̂s, lit. 'fame of the people') is a figure featured in a single moral anecdote commonly referred to as “the Sword of Damocles”, an allusion to the imminent and ever-present peril faced by those in positions of power. Damocles was an obsequious courtier in the court of Dionysius II of Syracuse, a 4th-century BC tyrant of Syracuse, Sicily. The anecdote apparently figured in the lost history of Sicily by Timaeus of Tauromenium (c. 356–260 BC). The Roman orator Cicero may have read it in the texts of Greek historian Diodorus Siculus. He used it in his Tusculanae Disputationes, 5. 61, by which means it passed into the European cultural mainstream.

The Sword - Sword of Damocles - Netflix

According to the story, Damocles was pandering to Dionysius, his king, and exclaimed to him that Dionysius was truly fortunate as a great man of power and authority, surrounded by magnificence. In response, Dionysius offered to switch places with Damocles for one day so that Damocles could taste that very fortune firsthand. Damocles quickly and eagerly accepted the king's proposal. Damocles sat down in the king's throne surrounded by every luxury, but Dionysius arranged that a huge sword should hang above the throne, held at the pommel only by a single hair of a horse's tail. Damocles finally begged the king that he be allowed to depart because he no longer wanted to be so fortunate, realizing that with great fortune and power comes also great danger. King Dionysius effectively conveyed the sense of constant fear in which a person with great power may live. Cicero used this story as the last in a series of contrasting examples for reaching the conclusion towards which he had been moving in this fifth Disputation, in which the theme is that having virtue is sufficient for living a happy life. Cicero asks, “Does not Dionysius seem to have made it sufficiently clear that there can be nothing happy for the person over whom some fear always looms?”

The Sword - References - Netflix