The Singing Bee Australia - Netflix

The Australian version of the music game show where six contestants vocally put their knowledge of song lyrics to the test as they compete for the title of The Singing Bee Champion and the chance to win up to A\$50,000 cash.

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: None

The Singing Bee Australia - Bee Gees - Netflix

The Bee Gees were a pop music group formed in 1958. Their lineup consisted of brothers Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb. The trio were successful for most of their decades of recording music, but they had two distinct periods of exceptional success: as a popular music act in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and as prominent performers of the disco music era in the mid-to-late 1970s. The group sang recognisable three-part tight harmonies; Robin's clear vibrato lead vocals were a hallmark of their earlier hits, while Barry's R&B falsetto became their signature sound during the mid-to-late 1970s and 1980s. The Bee Gees wrote all of their own hits, as well as writing and producing several major hits for other artists. Born on the Isle of Man to English parents, the Gibb brothers lived in Chorlton, Manchester, England, until the late 1950s. There, in 1955, they formed the Rattlesnakes. The family then moved to Redcliffe, in Queensland, Australia, and then to Cribb Island. After achieving their first chart success in Australia as the Bee Gees with “Spicks and Specks” (their 12th single), they returned to the UK in January 1967, when producer Robert Stigwood began promoting them to a worldwide audience. The Bee Gees have sold more than 220 million records worldwide, making them one of the world's best-selling artists of all time. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997; the presenter of the award to “Britain's first family of harmony” was Brian Wilson, historical leader of The Beach Boys, another “family act” featuring three harmonising brothers. The Bee Gees' Hall of Fame citation says, “Only Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Michael Jackson, Garth Brooks and Paul McCartney have outsold the Bee Gees.” Following Maurice's death in January 2003, at the age of 53, Barry and Robin retired the group's name after 45 years of activity. In 2009, Robin announced that he and Barry had agreed the Bee Gees would re-form and perform again. Robin died in May 2012, aged 62, after a prolonged struggle with cancer and other health problems, leaving Barry as the only surviving member of the group's final line-up.

The Singing Bee Australia - Bee Gees' 1st, Horizontal and Idea - Netflix

Two more singles followed in early 1968: the ballad “Words” (No. 8 UK, No. 15 US) and the double A-sided single “Jumbo” b/w “The Singer Sang His Song”. “Jumbo”, the Bee Gees' least successful single to date, only reached No. 25 in the UK and No. 57 in the US. The Bee Gees felt “The Singer Sang His Song” was the stronger of the two sides, an opinion shared by listeners in the Netherlands who made it a No. 3 hit. Further Bee Gees chart singles followed: “I've Gotta Get a Message to You”, their second UK No. 1 (No. 8 US), and “I Started a Joke” (No. 6 US), both culled from the band's third album Idea. Idea reached No. 4 in the UK and was another top 20 album in the US (No. 17). Following the tour and TV special to promote the album, Vince Melouney left the group, desiring to play more of a blues style music than the Gibbs were writing. Melouney did achieve one feat while with the Bee Gees: his composition “Such a Shame” (from Idea) is the only song on any Bee Gees album not written by a Gibb brother. The group also filmed a BBC television special with Frankie Howerd, called Frankie Howerd Meets the Bee Gees, written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson. This gave the group the opportunity to display their comedy skills in sketches with Howerd. The band were due to begin a seven-week tour of the US on 2 August 1968, but on 27 July, Robin collapsed and fell unconscious. He was admitted to a London nursing home suffering from nervous exhaustion, and the American tour was postponed. The band began recording their sixth album, which resulted in their spending a week recording at Atlantic Studios in New York. Robin, still feeling poorly, missed the New York sessions, but the rest of the band put away instrumental tracks and demos.

Before their departure from Australia to England, Hugh Gibb sent demos to Brian Epstein, who managed the Beatles and directed NEMS, a British music store. Epstein passed the demo tapes to Robert Stigwood, who had recently joined NEMS. After an audition with Stigwood in February 1967, the Bee Gees signed a five-year contract whereby Polydor Records would release their records in the UK, and Atco Records would do so in the US. Work quickly began on the group's first international album, and Stigwood launched a promotional campaign to coincide with its release. Stigwood proclaimed that the Bee Gees were “The Most Significant New Talent of 1967”, thus initiating the comparison of the Bee Gees to the Beatles. Before recording the first album, the group expanded to include Colin Petersen and Vince Melouney. “New York Mining Disaster 1941”, their second British single (their first-issued UK 45 rpm was “Spicks and Specks”), was issued to radio stations with a blank white label listing only the song title. Some DJs immediately assumed this was a new single by the Beatles and started playing the song in heavy rotation. This helped the song climb into the top 20 in both the UK and US. No such chicanery was needed to boost the Bee Gees' second single, “To Love Somebody”, into the US Top 20. Originally written for Otis Redding, “To Love Somebody”, a soulful ballad sung by Barry, has since become a pop standard covered by many artists including the Flying Burrito Brothers, Rod Stewart, Bonnie Tyler, Janis Joplin, the Animals, Gary Puckett and the Union Gap, Nina Simone, Jimmy Somerville, Billy Corgan and Michael Bolton. Another single, “Holiday”, released in the US, peaked at No. 16. The parent album, Bee Gees 1st (their first internationally), peaked at No. 7 in the US and No. 8 in the UK. Bill Shepherd was credited as the arranger. After recording that album, the group recorded their first BBC session at the Playhouse Theatre, Northumberland Avenue, in London, with Bill Bebb as the producer, and they performed three songs. That session is included on BBC Sessions: 1967–1973 (2008). Following the release of Bee Gees' 1st, the group was first introduced in New York as “the English surprise”. At that time, the band made their first British TV appearance on Top of the Pops. Maurice recalled: In late 1967, they began recording for the second album. On 21 December 1967, for a live broadcast from Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, they performed their own song, “Thank You For Christmas” (which was recorded in the Horizontal sessions but was not released until 2008), as well as “Silent Night” and “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing”. The folk group the Settlers also performed on that programme and were conducted by the Very Reverend Edward H. Patey, dean of the cathedral. Ten days later, the band finished the year off with their Christmas Eve special, How on Earth? January 1968 began with a promotional trip to the US. Los Angeles Police was on alert in anticipation of a Beatles-type reception, and special security arrangements were being put in place. In February, Horizontal repeated the success of their first album, featuring the group's first UK No. 1 single “Massachusetts” (a No. 11 US hit) and the No. 7 UK single “World”. The sound of the album Horizontal had a more “rock” sound than their previous release, although ballads like “And the Sun Will Shine” and “Really and Sincerely” were also prominent. The Horizontal album reached No. 12 in the US and No. 16 in the UK. Promoting the record, the group made their first appearance on US television on The Smothers Brothers Show, on CBS. Tommy Smothers had first encountered the band on a trip to London, and became their friend as well as a fan. That evening, Smothers wore a shirt which Maurice had bought for him at the Beatles' Apple Boutique. With the release of Horizontal, they also embarked on a Scandinavian tour with concerts in Copenhagen. Around the same time, the Bee Gees turned down an offer to write and perform the soundtrack for the film Wonderwall, according to director Joe Massot. On 27 February 1968, the band, backed by the 17-piece Massachusetts String Orchestra, began their first tour of Germany with two concerts at Hamburg Musikhalle. In March 1968, the band was supported by Procol Harum (who had a well-known hit “A Whiter Shade of Pale”) on their German tour. As Robin's partner Molly Hullis recalls: “Germans were wilder than the fans in England at the heights of Beatlemania.” The tour schedule took them to 11 venues in as many days with 18 concerts played, finishing with a brace of shows at the Stadthalle, Braunschweig. After that, the group was off to Switzerland. As Maurice described it: On 17 March, the band performed “Words” on The Ed Sullivan Show. The other artists who performed on that night's show were Lucille Ball, George Hamilton and Fran Jeffries. On 27 March 1968, the band performed at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

The Singing Bee Australia - References - Netflix