The Queen - Netflix

Five leading British actresses play the Queen at pivotal times in her reign in this ground-breaking series, mixing dramatised scenes behind palace doors with news archive and testimony from royal insiders.

The Queen - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 50 minutes

Premier: 2009-11-29

The Queen - God Save the Queen - Netflix

“God Save the Queen” (alternatively “God Save the King”, depending on the gender of the reigning monarch) is the national or royal anthem in a number of Commonwealth realms, their territories, and the British Crown dependencies. The author of the tune is unknown, and it may originate in plainchant; but an attribution to the composer John Bull is sometimes made. The term “God Save the King” historically first appeared in the Hebrew Tanach, in the Book of Kings ( 1 Kings 1:38–40): Zadok the Priest, and Nathan the Prophet anointed Solomon King. And all the people rejoiced, and said: God save the King! Long live the King! May the King live for ever, Amen, Alleluia. “God Save the Queen” is the national anthem of the United Kingdom and one of two national anthems used by New Zealand since 1977, as well as for several of the UK's territories that have their own additional local anthem. It is also the royal anthem – played specifically in the presence of the monarch – of all the aforementioned countries, as well as Australia (since 1984), Canada (since 1980), Barbados and Tuvalu. In countries not previously part of the British Empire, the tune of “God Save the Queen” has provided the basis for various patriotic songs, though still generally connected with royal ceremony. The melody continues to be used for the national anthem of Liechtenstein, “Oben am jungen Rhein”, and the royal anthem of Norway, “Kongesangen”. In the United States, the melody is used for the patriotic song “My Country, 'Tis of Thee”. Beyond its first verse, which is consistent, “God Save the Queen/King” has many historic and extant versions. Since its first publication, different verses have been added and taken away and, even today, different publications include various selections of verses in various orders. In general, only one verse is sung. Sometimes two verses are sung, and on rare occasions, three. The sovereign and her or his spouse are saluted with the entire composition, while other members of the Royal Family who are entitled to royal salute (such as the Prince of Wales, Duke of Cambridge and Duke of Sussex along with their spouses) receive just the first six bars. The first six bars also form all or part of the Vice Regal Salute in some Commonwealth realms outside the UK (e.g., in Canada, governors general and lieutenant governors at official events are saluted with the first six bars of “God Save the Queen” followed by the first four and last four bars of “O Canada”), as well as the salute given to governors of British overseas territories.

The Queen - Use in the United Kingdom - Netflix

“God Save the Queen” is the national anthem of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Like many aspects of British constitutional life, its official status derives from custom and use, not from Royal Proclamation or Act of Parliament. In general, only one or two verses are sung, but on rare occasions, three. The variation in the UK of the lyrics to “God Save the Queen” is the oldest amongst those currently used, and forms the basis on which all other versions used throughout the Commonwealth are formed; though, again, the words have varied throughout these years. England has no official national anthem of its own; “God Save the Queen” is treated as the English national anthem when England is represented at sporting events (though there are some exceptions to this rule, such as cricket where “Jerusalem” is used). There is a movement to establish an English national anthem, with Blake and Parry's “Jerusalem” and Elgar's “Land of Hope and Glory” among the top contenders. Scotland has its own national song and Wales has its own national anthem for political and national events and for use at international football, rugby union and other sports in which those nations compete independently. On all occasions Wales' national anthem is “Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau” (Land of my Fathers). Scotland has no single anthem; “Scotland the Brave” was traditionally used until the 1990s, when “Flower of Scotland” was adopted. In Northern Ireland, “God Save the Queen” is still used as the official anthem. The phrase “No surrender” is occasionally sung in the bridge before “Send her victorious” by England football fans at matches. The phrase “no surrender” is also associated with Combat 18, a white supremacist group. The phrase is also associated with Ulster loyalism and can sometimes be heard at the same point before Northern Ireland football matches. Since 2003, “God Save the Queen”, considered an all inclusive Anthem for Great Britain and Northern Ireland, as well as other countries within the Commonwealth, has been dropped from the Commonwealth Games. Northern Irish athletes receive their gold medals to the tune of the “Londonderry Air”, popularly known as “Danny Boy”. In 2006, English winners heard Elgar's Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1, usually known as “Land of Hope and Glory”, but after a poll conducted by the Commonwealth Games Council for England prior to the 2010 Games, “Jerusalem” was adopted as England's new Commonwealth Games anthem. In sports in which the UK competes as one nation, most notably as Great Britain at the Olympics, “God Save the Queen” is used to represent anyone or any team that comes from the United Kingdom.

The Queen - References - Netflix