The New Statesman - Netflix

A British comedy that might be described as a combination of Yes, Minister and Blackadder, this is the story of A. B'Stard, a statesman in the tradition of Genghis Khan, who will stop at nothing to make himself richer and more comfortable. Arguably the most conservative member of the British Parliament, he is aided by a witless colleague, MP Piers Fletcher-Dervish.

The New Statesman - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 25 minutes

Premier: 1987-09-13

The New Statesman - Christopher Hitchens - Netflix

Christopher Eric Hitchens (13 April 1949 – 15 December 2011) was an Anglo-American author, columnist, essayist, orator, religious and literary critic, social critic, and journalist. Hitchens was the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of over 30 books, including five collections of essays on culture, politics and literature. A staple of public discourse, his confrontational style of debate made him both a lauded intellectual and a controversial public figure. He contributed to New Statesman, The Nation, The Weekly Standard, The Atlantic, London Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, Slate, Free Inquiry and Vanity Fair. Having long described himself as a socialist, Marxist and an anti-totalitarian, he broke from the political left after what he called the “tepid reaction” of the Western left to the Satanic Verses controversy, followed by the left's embrace of Bill Clinton and the antiwar movement's opposition to NATO intervention in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the 1990s. His support of the Iraq War separated him further. His writings include critiques of public figures Bill Clinton, Henry Kissinger, Mother Teresa and Diana, Princess of Wales. He was the elder brother of the conservative journalist and author Peter Hitchens. He also advocated for the separation of church and state. As an antitheist, he regarded concepts of a god or supreme being as a totalitarian belief that impedes individual freedom. He argued that free expression and scientific discovery would eventually replace religion as an ethical code of conduct for human civilization. The dictum “What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence” has become known as Hitchens's razor.

The New Statesman - Literature reviews - Netflix

Hitchens wrote a monthly essay in The Atlantic and occasionally contributed to other literary journals. One of his books, Unacknowledged Legislation: Writers in the Public Sphere, collected these works. In Why Orwell Matters, he defends Orwell's writings against modern critics as relevant today and progressive for his time. In the 2008 book Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left, many literary critiques are included of essays and other books of writers, such as David Horowitz and Edward Said. During a three-hour In Depth interview on Book TV, he named authors who influenced his views, including Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh, Kingsley Amis, P. G. Wodehouse and Conor Cruise O'Brien.

The New Statesman - References - Netflix