The Dance Scene - Netflix

The Dance Scene centers on the life and work of acclaimed choreographer and creative director Laurieann Gibson. Gibson's 15 years in the business working with talented artists from Diddy to Alicia Keys, and her choreography for all of Lady Gaga's music videos as well as her most recent world tour has made her one of the industry's most sought-after Divas of Dance. Joining Laurieann on the show is her troupe of trusted and aspiring dancers and choreographers, who both respect and fear the woman who can easily "make or break" them.

The Dance Scene - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2011-04-10

The Dance Scene - Dirty Dancing - Netflix

Dirty Dancing is a 1987 American romantic drama dance film written by Eleanor Bergstein, directed by Emile Ardolino and starring Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey in the lead roles, and featuring Cynthia Rhodes and Jerry Orbach. Originally a low-budget film by a new studio, Vestron Pictures, Dirty Dancing became a box office hit. As of 2009, it has earned over $214 million worldwide. It was the first film to sell more than a million copies on home video, and the Dirty Dancing soundtrack created by Jimmy Ienner generated two multi-platinum albums and multiple singles, including “(I've Had) The Time of My Life”, which won both the Golden Globe and Academy Award for Best Original Song, and a Grammy Award for best duet. The film's popularity led to a 2004 prequel, Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights, and a stage version which has had sellout performances in Australia, Europe, and North America. A made-for-TV remake was released in 2017. Unlike the original theatrical film, the remake received negative reviews from critics.

The Dance Scene - Critical response - Netflix

Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a rating of 72% based on reviews from 61 critics and a rating average of 6.1/10. The site's critical consensus reads, “Like its winsome characters, Dirty Dancing uses impressive choreography and the power of song to surmount a series of formidable obstacles.” Metacritic, another review aggregator, assigned the film a weighted average score of 65 out of 100, based on 20 critics, indicating “generally favorable reviews”. Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “A–” on an A+ to F scale. For the film's opening, The New York Times published a review titled “Dirty Dancing Rocks to an Innocent Beat”. The Times reviewer called the film “a metaphor for America in the summer of 1963 – orderly, prosperous, bursting with good intentions, a sort of Yiddish-inflected Camelot.” Other reviews were more mixed: Gene Siskel gave the film a “marginal Thumbs Up” as he liked Jennifer Grey's acting and development of her character, while Roger Ebert gave it “Thumbs Down” due to its “idiot plot”, calling it a “tired and relentlessly predictable story of love between kids from different backgrounds.” TIME magazine was lukewarm, saying, “If the ending of Eleanor Bergstein's script is too neat and inspirational, the rough energy of the film's song and dance does carry one along, past the whispered doubts of better judgment.” In a retrospective review, Jezebel's Irin Carmon called the film “the greatest movie of all time” as “a great, brave movie for women” with “some subtle, retrospectively sharp-eyed critiques of class and gender.” Abortion rights advocates have called the film the “gold standard” for cinematic portrayals of abortion, which author Yannis Tzioumakis described as offering a “compassionate depiction of abortion in which the woman seeking an abortion was not demonized with the primary concerns being her health and preserving her capacity to bear children at a future time rather than the ethical dilemma that might or might not inform her decision, a portrayal that is not necessarily available in current films.” The film drew adult audiences instead of the expected teens, with viewers rating the film highly. Many filmgoers, after seeing the film once, went right back into the theater to watch it a second time. Word-of-mouth promotion took the film to the number one position in the United States, and in 10 days it had broken the $10 million mark. By November, it was also achieving international fame. Within seven months of release, it had brought in $63 million in the US and boosted attendance in dance classes across America. It was one of the highest-grossing films of 1987, earning $170 million worldwide. The film's popularity continued to grow after its initial release. It was the number one video rental of 1988 and became the first film to sell a million copies on video. When the film was re-released in 1997, ten years after its original release, Swayze received his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and videos were still selling at the rate of over 40,000 per month. As of 2005, it was selling a million DVDs per year, with over ten million copies sold as of 2007. A May 2007 survey by Britain's Sky Movies listed Dirty Dancing as number one on “Women's most-watched films”, above the Star Wars trilogy, Grease, The Sound of Music, and Pretty Woman. The film's popularity has also caused it to be called “the Star Wars for girls.” An April 2008 article in Britain's Daily Mail listed Dirty Dancing as number one on a list of “most romantic movie quotes ever”, for Baby's line: “I'm scared of walking out of this room and never feeling the rest of my whole life the way I feel when I'm with you.” The film's music has also had considerable impact. The closing song, “(I've Had) The Time of My Life”, has been listed as the “third most popular song played at funerals” in the UK.

The Dance Scene - References - Netflix