The Conspiracy Show - Netflix

Many believe that there are things in this world that aren't made public that the average person isn't supposed to know about. The truth may be hidden, but there are some people, like host Richard Syrett, who investigate these conspiracies and try to uncover the secrets. ``The Conspiracy Show'' examines claims of supernatural creatures, political cover-ups, medical discoveries, extraterrestrial life, paranormal phenomena and other unexplained mysteries. Using interviews with top researchers, skeptics, independent thinkers and authors, Syrett is determined to uncover the truth to some of the most extraordinary claims of conspiracy.

The Conspiracy Show - Netflix

Type: Talk Show

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2011-02-18

The Conspiracy Show - Conspiracy theory - Netflix

A conspiracy theory is an explanation of an event or situation that invokes an unwarranted conspiracy, generally one involving an illegal or harmful act carried out by government or other powerful actors. Conspiracy theories often produce hypotheses that contradict the prevailing understanding of history or simple facts. The term is often a derogatory one. According to the political scientist Michael Barkun, conspiracy theories rely on the view that the universe is governed by design, and embody three principles: nothing happens by accident, nothing is as it seems, and everything is connected. Another common feature is that conspiracy theories evolve to incorporate whatever evidence exists against them, so that they become, as Barkun writes, a closed system that is unfalsifiable, and therefore “a matter of faith rather than proof”. Skeptics are among their outspoken critics.

The Conspiracy Show - Sociological interpretations - Netflix

Christopher Hitchens described conspiracy theory as the “exhaust fumes of democracy”: the unavoidable result of a large amount of information circulating among a large number of people. Conspiracy theories may be emotionally satisfying, by assigning blame to a group to which the theorist does not belong and so absolving the theorist of moral or political responsibility in society. Likewise, Roger Cohen writing for The New York Times has said that, “captive minds; ... resort to conspiracy theory because it is the ultimate refuge of the powerless. If you cannot change your own life, it must be that some greater force controls the world.” Sociological historian Holger Herwig found in studying German explanations for the origins of World War I, “Those events that are most important are hardest to understand, because they attract the greatest attention from myth makers and charlatans.”

The Conspiracy Show - References - Netflix