The Client List - Netflix

After last season's cliffhanger finale, season two of The Client List promises to be no easier for Riley Parks at home or at work. The Texas single mother of two who, after being deserted by her husband and left in financial straits, took a job at a seemingly traditional day spa only to learn that sexual favors are being offered there on the side. After her estranged husband Kyle returns, for better or for worse, Riley must walk the fine line between her anger and love for him and the romantic feelings she has for her brother-in-law Evan Riley also takes a larger role at the spa, resulting in added power, responsibility and burden, further complicating her life. New threats abound this season and trust becomes an overwhelming issue for Riley as everyone, even those she believes she can count on the most, seems to be hiding their own secret.

The Client List - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2012-04-08

The Client List - Thin client - Netflix

A thin client is a lightweight computer that has been optimized for remoting into a server-based computing environment. The server does most of the work, which can include launching software programs, crunching numbers, and storing data. In contrast, a conventional desktop PC (fat client) typically performs the same tasks locally, but can also remote into a server-based environment when needed. Thin clients occur as components of a broader computing infrastructure, where many clients share their computations with a server or server farm. The server-side infrastructure makes use of cloud computing software such as application virtualization, hosted shared desktop (HSD) or desktop virtualization (VDI). This combination forms what is known as a cloud-based system where desktop resources are centralized at one or more data centers. The benefits of centralization are hardware resource optimization, reduced software maintenance, and improved security. Example of hardware resource optimization: Cabling, bussing and I/O can be minimized while idle memory and processing power can be applied to users sessions that most need it. Example of reduced software maintenance: Software patching, security updates, application/OS updates, and OS migrations can be applied, tested and activated for all users in one instance to accelerate roll-out and improve administrative efficiency. Example of improved security: Software assets are centralized and easily fire-walled, monitored and protected. Sensitive data is uncompromised in cases of desktop loss or theft. Thin client hardware generally consists of a computer terminal which provides I/O for a keyboard, mouse, monitor, jacks for sound peripherals, and open ports for USB devices (e.g., printer, flash drive, webcam, card reader, smartphone, etc.). Some thin clients include legacy serial or parallel ports to support older devices such as receipt printers, scales, time clocks, etc. Thin client software typically consists of a GUI (graphical user interface), cloud access agents (e.g., RDP, ICA, PCoIP), a local web browser, terminal emulations (in some cases), and a basic set of local utilities.

The Client List - Zero client - Netflix

While a traditional thin client is streamlined for multi-protocol client-server communication, it still contains a full operating system. A zero client makes use of very lightweight firmware that merely initializes network communication through a basic GUI (Graphical User Interface), decodes display information received from the server, and sends local input back to the host. A device with such simple functionality has less demand for complex hardware or silicon, and therefore becomes less prone to obsolescence. Another key benefit of the zero client model is that its lightweight firmware represents an ultra-small attack surface making it more secure than a thin client. Further, the local firmware is so simple that it requires very little setup or ongoing administration. It's the ultimate in desktop simplification but the trade-off is flexibility. Most mainstream zero clients are optimized for one communication protocol only. This limits the number of host environments that a zero client can provide its users with access to.

The Client List - References - Netflix