Southern Uncovered with the Lee Bros. - Netflix

James Beard Award-winning food and travel writers, Matt and Ted Lee, uncover the unexpected bites and sights in their hometown of Charleston, South Carolina. From Lowcountry oyster roasts to an undersea winery and dinner that comes with a side of dance lessons, Matt and Ted prove there's far more to Charleston's food scene than the tour guide lets on.

Southern Uncovered with the Lee Bros. - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2015-06-14

Southern Uncovered with the Lee Bros. - Chinatown, Los Angeles - Netflix

Chinatown is a neighborhood in Downtown Los Angeles, California that became a commercial center for Chinese and other Asian businesses in Central Los Angeles in 1938. The area includes restaurants, shops and art galleries but also has a residential neighborhood with a low-income, aging population of about 20,000 residents. The original Chinatown developed in the late 19th century, but it was demolished to make room for Union Station, the city's major ground-transportation center. A separate commercial center, known as “New Chinatown,” opened for business in 1938. Street and natural limits of the Chinatown neighborhood are: north, Beaudry Avenue, Stadium Way, North Broadway; east, the Los Angeles River; and southwest, Cesar Chavez Avenue. Chinatown beyond the concentrated business center is flanked by the Elysian Park to the north, Lincoln Heights to the east, Downtown to the south and southwest and Echo Park to the west and northwest. There are two schools and a branch library in Chinatown, as well as a city park and a state park. Many motion pictures have been filmed in the area.

Southern Uncovered with the Lee Bros. - New Chinatown and Little Italy - Netflix

The area that today encompasses New Chinatown was at one time part of Los Angeles' Little Italy. In the early 20th century, Italian immigrants settled in the area north of the Old Plaza. Many built businesses, including wineries (San Antonio Winery is still in existence). The Italian American Museum of Los Angeles in the El Pueblo de Los Ángeles Historical Monument opened in 2016. In the 1930s, under the efforts of Chinese-American community leader Peter Soo Hoo Sr., the design and operational concepts for a New Chinatown evolved through a collective community process, resulting in a blend of Chinese and American architecture. The Los Angeles Chinatown saw major development, especially as a tourist attraction, throughout the 1930s, with the development of the “Central Plaza,” a Hollywoodized version of Shanghai, containing names such as Bamboo Lane, Gin Ling Way and Chung King Road (named after the city of Chongqing in mainland China). Chinatown was designed by Hollywood film set designers, and a “Chinese” movie prop was subsequently donated by film director Cecil B. DeMille to give Chinatown an exotic atmosphere. The Hop Sing Tong Society is situated in Central Plaza, as are several other Chinatown lodges and guilds. Near Broadway, Central Plaza contains a statue honoring Dr. Sun Yat-sen, the Chinese revolutionary leader who is considered the “founder of modern China”. It was erected in the 1960s by the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association. A 7-foot tall statue of martial artist Bruce Lee was unveiled at Central Plaza on June 15, 2013.

During the 1980s, many buildings were constructed for new shopping centers and mini-malls, especially along Broadway. Metro Plaza Hotel was opened in the southwest corner of Chinatown in the early 1990s. A large Chinese gateway is found at the intersection of Broadway and Cesar Chavez Avenue, funded by the local Teochew-speaking population. New Chinatown is served by the Gold Line of the city's Metro Rail; parts of Old Chinatown were uncovered during excavation for another portion of the L.A. subway (the Red Line connection to Union Station). The Metro Rail station in Chinatown has been described as a spectacular pagoda-themed facility and as a cliché of neo-pagoda architecture by Christopher Hawthorne, the Los Angeles Times architecture critic. In 1983, two Los Angeles Police officers died in the line of duty when their patrol car was broadsided by a speeding car at the intersection of College Street and Broadway. The speeding car was carrying three suspects thought to be escaping from a drug deal gone bad. In 1984, a violent shootout in a jewelry store on Gin Lin Way resulted in the death of a Los Angeles Police officer. In 1985, a shooting occurred in the First Chinese Baptist Church on Yale Street. A pastor and a deacon were killed by a mentally ill man who was a former member of the church. The gunman was killed when an off-duty law enforcement officer returned fire. In 1996, Academy Award-winning (for the Killing Fields in 1985) Cambodian refugee, physician and actor, Haing S. Ngor, was killed in the Chinatown residential area in a bungled robbery attempt by members of an Asian gang. It had been speculated that he was assassinated for his activism against the Khmer Rouge government of Cambodia, but this idea was later proved unfounded. By 2000 many people had left the Chinatown for the City of Monterey Park, which has a Chinese community in the San Gabriel Valley. In 2000 AsianWeek said that the Los Angeles Chinatown was “troubled.” On June 28, 2008, a celebration of the 1938 founding of New Chinatown was held with the L.A. Chinatown 70th Anniversary Party. “Though lacking the hustle and bustle of San Francisco's Chinatown, Los Angeles' version has charms of its own.”

Southern Uncovered with the Lee Bros. - References - Netflix