Social Media Me - Netflix

This three-part series follows three characters' experiences with identity and self-esteem, as they navigate social media and real world relationships.

Social Media Me - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 10 minutes

Premier: 2017-05-04

Social Media Me - Me Too movement - Netflix

The Me Too movement (or “#MeToo”, with local alternatives in other languages) is an international movement against sexual harassment and assault. #MeToo spread virally in October 2017 as a hashtag used on social media to help demonstrate the widespread prevalence of sexual assault and harassment, especially in the workplace. It followed soon after the public revelations of sexual misconduct allegations against Harvey Weinstein. Tarana Burke, a social activist and community organizer, began using the phrase “Me Too” in 2006, and the phrase was popularized by Alyssa Milano in 2017 when she encouraged women to tweet about it and “give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem”. The response on Twitter included high-profile posts from several celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow, Ashley Judd, Jennifer Lawrence, and Uma Thurman.

Social Media Me - Challenging social norms - Netflix

In the wake of #MeToo, many countries such as the U.S., India, France, China, Japan, and Italy, have seen discussion in the media on whether cultural norms need to be changed for sexual harassment to be eradicated in the workplace. Dr. John Launer of Health Education England stated leaders must be made aware of common “mismatches of perceptions” at work to reduce incidents where one person thinks they are flirting while the other person feels like they're being demeaned or harassed. Reporter Anna North from Vox states one way to address #MeToo is teach children the basics of sex. North states the cultural notion that women do not enjoy sex leads men “to believe that a lukewarm yes is all they're ever going to get”, referring to a 2017 study which found that men who believe women only enjoy being forced into sex are “more likely to perceive women as consenting”. Alyssa Rosenberg of The Washington Post called for society to be careful of overreaching by “being clear about what behavior is criminal, what behavior is legal but intolerable in a workplace, and what private intimate behavior is worthy of condemnation” but not part of the workplace discussion. She says “preserving the nuances” is more inclusive and realistic. Professor Daniel Drezner stated that #MeToo laid the groundwork for two major cultural shifts. One is the acceptance that sexual harassment (not just sexual assault) is unacceptable in the workplace. The other is that when a powerful person is accused of sexual harassment, the reaction should be a presumption that the less powerful accuser is “likely telling the truth, because the risks of going public are great.” However, he states society is struggling with the speed at which change is being demanded.

Social Media Me - References - Netflix