Play for Tomorrow - Netflix

An anthology of 6 science fiction plays ; In "Crimes" a psychologist tries to cope with marital problems while working on the problem of prison overcrowding in the year 2002 ; In "Bright Eyes" Britain is seen to be in the middle of a Euro-war in the year 1999 ; In "Cricket" 2 village communities take unusual measures to win a local cricket match in the year 1997 ; In "The Nuclear Family" a 1999 British family take a working holiday in an underwater missile base ; in "Shades", set in 1999 again, the government has paid unemployed youths to live in converted office blocks and amuse themselves through virtual reality ; and in "Easter 2016" students in a Northern Ireland college stage an uprising to commemorate the Easter Rising of 1916.

Play for Tomorrow - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 1982-04-13

Play for Tomorrow - Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow (short story) - Netflix

“Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow” is a short story by Kurt Vonnegut originally written in 1953. It was first published in Galaxy Science Fiction magazine in January 1954, where the story was titled “The Big Trip Up Yonder”, which is the protagonist's euphemism for dying. A revised version bearing the title “Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow” appeared in Vonnegut's collection of short stories, Canary in a Cat House (1961), and was reprinted in Welcome to the Monkey House (1968). The new title comes from the famous line in Shakespeare's play Macbeth starting “Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow”.

Play for Tomorrow - Setting - Netflix

The original story is set in 2185 A.D., 102 years after the invention of a medicine called anti-gerasone, which halts the aging process and prevents people from dying of old age as long as they keep taking it. Anti-gerasone is cheap and plentiful, made from mud and dandelions. As a result, the world now suffers from severe overpopulation and shortages of food and resources. With the exception of the wealthy, most of the population appears to survive on a diet of foods made from processed seaweed and sawdust. A cautionary tale, an outside authority figure within the story admonishes the population that “most of the world's ills can be traced to the fact that Man's knowledge of himself has not kept pace with his knowledge of the physical world”.

Play for Tomorrow - References - Netflix