Pelswick - Netflix

Pelswick Eggert is a 13-year-old 8th grader with a sharp tongue, a healthy suspicion of authority and a complete lack of fear. Oh yeah, and he uses a wheelchair because he has no feeling below his armpits. But the point is that Pelswick is just like any other 13-year-old when it comes to being independent, disaster-prone, mixed-up, and plugged into everyday pop culture. Pelswick's home life is dominated by his fiercely-protective (and totally insane) Gram-Gram, as well as his politically correct father Quentin, who will go to any length to avoid offending anyone. ("Nobody's wrong, they're just differently right!") Also in the picture are precocious younger sister Kate, and little brother Bobby, who says exactly one word per episode. At school, Pelswick's life is made miserable by bully Boyd Scullarzo, and Boyd's none-too-bright sidekick.

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2000-10-05

Pelswick - Avatar: The Last Airbender - Netflix

Avatar: The Last Airbender (Avatar: The Legend of Aang in some regions) is an American animated television series that aired for three seasons on Nickelodeon. The series began in February 2005 and concluded with a two-hour episode titled Sozin's Comet in July 2008. Avatar: The Last Airbender is set in an Asiatic-like world in which some people can manipulate the classical elements with psychokinetic variants of the Chinese martial arts known as “bending”. The series is presented in a style that combines anime with American cartoons and relies on the imagery of East-and-South Asian, Inuit, and New World societies. It follows the protagonist, twelve-year-old Aang and his friends, who must bring peace and unity to the world by ending the Fire Lord's war with three nations. The series was commercially successful and was acclaimed by audiences and critics who praised its art direction, humor, cultural references, characters, and themes. It was nominated for—and won—Annie Awards, Genesis Awards, a Primetime Emmy Award, and a Peabody Award. The first season's success prompted Nickelodeon to order a second and third season and the series inspired a critically panned but financially successful live-action film, The Last Airbender, considered one of the worst movies ever made, which was directed by M. Night Shyamalan. Merchandising for the series consisted of action figures, a trading card game, three video games, stuffed animals distributed by Paramount Parks, and two Lego sets. An art book was published in June 2010. A sequel series titled The Legend of Korra aired from 2012 to 2014. The complete series was released on Blu-ray on June 5, 2018 for the 10th anniversary of season 3's finale.

Pelswick - Influences - Netflix

The series is notable for borrowing extensively from East Asian art and mythology for its universe. Its creators employed cultural consultants Edwin Zane and calligrapher Siu-Leung Lee to help determine its art direction and settings. Its character designs are influenced by Chinese art and history, Hinduism, Taoism and Buddhism, and Yoga. Jeremy Zuckerman and Benjamin Wynn composed the series' music and sound; they experimented with a wide range of instruments, including the guzheng, pipa, and duduk, to match the show's Asia-influenced setting. The art style of the fictitious locations used in the series are based on real locations in Asia. Sites such as the Forbidden City and the Great Wall of China in Beijing were inspirations for the Earth Kingdom city of Ba Sing Se. The fighting styles employed by the show's characters are derived from Chinese martial arts, for which the film-makers employed Sifu Kisu of the Harmonious Fist Chinese Athletic Association as a consultant. Each fighting style is unique to the “benders” who use them or characters who are aligned to a certain element. For example, practitioners of “waterbending” use movements influenced by T'ai chi and focused on alignment, body structure, breath, and visualization. Hung Gar was the inspiration for practitioners of “earthbending”, and was chosen for its firmly rooted stances and powerful strikes as a representation of the solidity of earth. Northern Shaolin, which uses strong arm and leg movements, was chosen to represent “firebending”. Ba Gua, which uses dynamic circular movements and quick directional changes, was used for “airbending”. The Chu Gar Southern Praying Mantis style can be seen practiced by the earthbender Toph, who develops a unique fighting style as a result of her blindness. Asian cinema influenced the presentation of these martial-art bending moves.

Pelswick - References - Netflix