Meow Madness - Netflix

Meow Madness is a Hallmark original annual sporting event with lovable kittens, all shapes, sizes and colors. Buoyed by the success of the Kitten Bowl, the Hallmark Channel is debuting a new show hosted by Beth Stern that will air on Monday, April 3 — the same day as the NCAA men's basketball national championship game. Stern, the wife of radio shock jock Howard Stern, is a huge cat ambassador who works year-round with the North Shore Animal League of America, urging people to spay, neuter and release and adopt pets. The Sterns are foster parents to kittens — a few hundred in all over the last couple years. Beth tries to find permanent homes, but letting go is never easy. "It's the hardest thing in the world to see them go", she said. "I think I've cried over 300 times".

The show is staged on a mini basketball court on a midtown Manhattan soundstage. Kittens, with cute names like Meow Ming, Lonso Fur-Ball, Stephen Furry and Meow-Tumbo roamed over the court as well as a faux-Vegas casino area where they could "make bets".

Meow Madness - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 120 minutes

Premier: 2017-04-03

Meow Madness - Dancing mania - Netflix

Dancing mania (also known as dancing plague, choreomania, St. John's Dance and St. Vitus's Dance) was a social phenomenon that occurred primarily in mainland Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries. It involved groups of people dancing erratically, sometimes thousands at a time. The mania affected men, women, and children who danced until they collapsed from exhaustion. One of the first major outbreaks was in Aachen, in the Holy Roman Empire, in 1374, and it quickly spread throughout Europe; one particularly notable outbreak occurred in Strasbourg in 1518, also in the Holy Roman Empire. Affecting thousands of people across several centuries, dancing mania was not an isolated event, and was well documented in contemporary reports. It was nevertheless poorly understood, and remedies were based on guesswork. Generally, musicians accompanied dancers, to help ward off the mania, but this tactic sometimes backfired by encouraging more to join in. There is no consensus among modern-day scholars as to the cause of dancing mania. The several theories proposed range from religious cults being behind the processions to people dancing to relieve themselves of stress and put the poverty of the period out of their minds. It is speculated to have been a mass hysteria, in which physical symptoms with no known physical cause are observed to affect a group of people, as a form of social influence.

Meow Madness - Tarantism - Netflix

In Italy, a similar phenomenon was tarantism, in which the victims were said to have been poisoned by a tarantula or scorpion. Its earliest known outbreak was in the 13th century, and the only antidote known was to dance to particular music to separate the venom from the blood. It occurred only in the summer months. As with dancing mania, people would suddenly begin to dance, sometimes affected by a perceived bite or sting and were joined by others, who believed the venom from their own old bites was reactivated by the heat or the music. Dancers would perform a tarantella, accompanied by music which would eventually “cure” the victim, at least temporarily. Some participated in further activities, such as tying themselves up with vines and whipping each other, pretending to sword fight, drinking large amounts of wine, and jumping into the sea. Some died if there was no music to accompany their dancing. Sufferers typically had symptoms resembling those of dancing mania, such as headaches, trembling, twitching and visions. As with dancing mania, participants apparently did not like the color black, and women were reported to be most affected. Unlike dancing mania, tarantism was confined to Italy and southern Europe. It was common until the 17th century, but ended suddenly, with only very small outbreaks in Italy until as late as 1959. A study of the phenomenon in 1959 by religious history professor Ernesto de Martino revealed that most cases of tarantism were probably unrelated to spider bites. Many participants admitted that they had not been bitten, but believed they were infected by someone who had been, or that they had simply touched a spider. The result was mass panic, with a “cure” that allowed people to behave in ways that were, normally, prohibited at the time. Despite their differences, tarantism and dancing mania are often considered synonymous.

Meow Madness - References - Netflix