Lou Dobbs Tonight - Netflix

"Lou Dobbs Tonight "is an American editorial commentary and discussion program hosted by Lou Dobbs, which previously broadcast on CNN and is currently broadcast on the Fox Business Network. The hour-long show aired live on evenings every weekday, and was replayed in the overnight/early morning hours. It covered the major news stories of the day with a focus on politics and economics. Field correspondents provided additional reporting and occasionally served as guest anchors. During Dobbs' tenure, notable politicians and economists were often guests on the show, facing his often pointed questioning. On November 11, 2009, Dobbs announced that he would be leaving CNN effective immediately. CNN anchor John King replaced the outgoing Dobbs beginning on March 22, 2010 with his new show John King, USA. Dobbs was eventually hired by Fox Business Network, which re-launched Lou Dobbs Tonight in March 2011.

Lou Dobbs Tonight - Netflix

Type: Talk Show

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2003-06-16

Lou Dobbs Tonight - Lou Dobbs - Netflix

Louis Carl Dobbs (born September 24, 1945) is an American television personality, author, radio host, and anchor of Lou Dobbs Tonight on Fox Business Network. Dobbs worked with CNN since its founding in 1980, serving as a reporter and vice president. He was the host and managing editor for CNN's Moneyline, which premiered in 1980 and was renamed Lou Dobbs Tonight in 2003. Dobbs resigned from CNN in 1999, rejoined in 2001, and resigned again in November 2009. In 2011, he resumed anchoring Lou Dobbs Tonight on Fox Business Network. He formerly hosted a syndicated USRN radio show, Lou Dobbs Radio, and has written several books since 2001. Dobbs describes himself as an “independent populist” and is known for his pro-Trump coverage, anti-illegal-immigration views, promotion of birther conspiracy theories, and opposition to NAFTA.

Lou Dobbs Tonight - Immigration - Netflix

Dobbs has been strongly opposed to both illegal immigration and foreign worker programs as the H-1B visa program and guest-worker programs. In a 2006 article, Dobbs expressed frustration at failed legislation to build a southern “border fence to stop the flow of illegal aliens and drugs across our borders.” He argued that the “true victims of corporate America's lust for cheap labor” were “American working men and women, taxpayers all.” Dobbs' show has made factually incorrect claims, such as the one that illegal immigrants were responsible for bringing 7,000 new cases of leprosy to the United States in a three-year period, where the actual timeframe was over the last thirty years. In addressing the leprosy issue, Dobbs in May 2007 compared his critics from the left and right political spectrums to “commies” and “fascists.” Dobbs has criticized local officials for their approach to border security. In October 2007 he labeled then-New York Governor Eliot Spitzer an “idiot” for advocating the issuance of driver's licenses to illegal immigrants. Hillary Clinton labeled Dobbs' illegal immigration segments as having “all that hot air.” At about 10:30 a.m. on October 5, 2009, a bullet struck Dobbs' home as his wife stood outside it. The bullet struck the vinyl siding of their attic without penetrating the vinyl and fell to the ground. Dobbs attributed the incident to his stance against amnesty for illegal immigrants. The New Jersey State Police troopers' account of the incident attributed it to a stray bullet from a hunter in the vicinity. In a November 2009 interview with Telemundo, Dobbs said that the U.S. needed a “rational, effective humane policy” for immigration that included enhanced border security and also “the ability to legalize illegal immigrants on certain conditions.” In March 2009, Dobbs said he thought that there should not be a St. Patricks Day. In October 2010, The Nation published the results of a yearlong investigation detailing undocumented workers who had worked on Dobbs' personal properties. The labor involved upkeep of Dobbs' multimillion-dollar estates in New Jersey and Florida, including the horses belonging to his daughter, Hillary, a champion show jumper. The article featured interviews with five immigrants who had worked without papers on Dobbs' properties. Dobbs and his daughter had declined to comment to The Nation as part of the story. Speaking to the Associated Press, Dobbs referred to the article as “a political assault,” claiming it was a lie that he hired illegal immigrants. He said: “I have never, do not now, and never will.” Dobbs' critics, including columnist James K. Glassman, author of Dow 36,000 and member of the American Enterprise Institute think tank, have accused him of inciting xenophobia. Others have accused him of Hispanophobia, a charge he denies and one which he has said offends him deeply, as his wife Debi Segura is a Mexican-American.

Lou Dobbs Tonight - References - Netflix