Killing Fields - Netflix

There are isolated places in America that appear untouched by anyone. But underneath the surface, these beautiful landscapes reveal a much more sinister reality – a dumping ground for bodies and a home to countless unsolved murders. On Tuesday, January 5 at 10 PM ET/PT, Discovery Channel will premiere its first-ever true crime series titled Killing Fields and take viewers inside an active criminal investigation as it unfolds. Shot in real time, the series follows the hunt for the killer.

Killing Fields will go inside a case that went cold nearly two decades ago in the small community of Iberville Parish, Louisiana, located just 15 miles from the state capitol, Baton Rouge. In June 1997, Louisiana State University graduate student Eugenie Boisfontaine was last seen near LSU's lakes. Two months later, her body was found nearby in a watery ditch with evidence of blunt force trauma to her head. But who did it and why? Was it a single act of violence? Or was her murder part of a much bigger string of killings? Between 1997 and 2003, there were 60 cases of missing and murdered women in the area that went unsolved. And to make it even more complicated, the Baton Rouge area had multiple serial killers operating at the same time with two of the their victims living on the same street as Eugenie. Could these murders be connected?

Detective Rodie Sanchez was assigned to the case in 1997 and hasn't stopped thinking about it since. He makes the bold decision to come out of retirement and gets permission to re-open the case. Rodie is determined to solve the mystery and make good on a broken promise to Eugenie's mother: to find the person (or persons) responsible for killing her daughter. "You never forget your first murder or crime scene," Rodie said. "Once that gets in your blood, you want to be a cop for the rest of your life. I had a good life in law enforcement for over 30 some years. I missed it and thought about [this case] every day."

Joining Rodie in the chase is a young hot-shot detective, Aubrey St. Angelo, who has a knack for reading people and isn't afraid to ask the tough questions. However, the two can't solve this case alone – they are joined by top-notch detectives at the Iberville Parish Sheriff's office. With advancements in forensic science and DNA analysis, a lot has changed since 1997. But will this be enough to crack the case for good? And will Rodie be able to finally rest and move beyond the case that has forever haunted him?

Killing Fields - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2016-01-05

Killing Fields - Khmer Rouge Killing Fields - Netflix

The Cambodian Killing Fields (Khmer: វាលពិឃាត, Khmer pronunciation: [ʋiəl pikʰiət]) are a number of sites in Cambodia where collectively more than a million people were killed and buried by the Khmer Rouge regime, during its rule of the country from 1975 to 1979, immediately after the end of the Cambodian Civil War (1970–1975). The mass killings are widely regarded as part of a broad state-sponsored genocide (the Cambodian genocide). Analysis of 20,000 mass grave sites by the DC-Cam Mapping Program and Yale University indicate at least 1,386,734 victims of execution. Estimates of the total number of deaths resulting from Khmer Rouge policies, including disease and starvation, range from 1.7 to 2.5 million out of a 1975 population of roughly 8 million. In 1979, Vietnam invaded Democratic Kampuchea and toppled the Khmer Rouge regime. The Cambodian journalist Dith Pran coined the term “killing fields” after his escape from the regime.

The Khmer Rouge regime arrested and eventually executed almost everyone suspected of connections with the former government or with foreign governments, as well as professionals and intellectuals. Ethnic Vietnamese, ethnic Thai, ethnic Chinese, ethnic Cham, Cambodian Christians, and the Buddhist monkhood were the demographic targets of persecution. As a result, Pol Pot has been described as “a genocidal tyrant.” Martin Shaw described the Cambodian genocide as “the purest genocide of the Cold War era.” Ben Kiernan estimates that about 1.7 million people were killed. Researcher Craig Etcheson of the Documentation Center of Cambodia suggests that the death toll was between 2 and 2.5 million, with a “most likely” figure of 2.2 million. After 5 years of researching some 20,000 grave sites, he concludes that, “these mass graves contain the remains of 1,386,734 victims of execution.” A UN investigation reported 2–3 million dead, while UNICEF estimated 3 million had been killed. Demographic analysis by Patrick Heuveline suggests that between 1.17 and 3.42 million Cambodians were killed, while Marek Sliwinski suggests that 1.8 million is a conservative figure. Even the Khmer Rouge acknowledged that 2 million had been killed—though they attributed those deaths to a subsequent Vietnamese invasion. By late 1979, UN and Red Cross officials were warning that another 2.25 million Cambodians faced death by starvation due to “the near destruction of Cambodian society under the regime of ousted Prime Minister Pol Pot”, who were saved by international aid after the Vietnamese invasion.

Killing Fields - Prosecution for crimes against humanity - Netflix

In 1997 the Cambodian government asked for the UN's assistance in setting up a genocide tribunal. It took nine years to agree to the shape and structure of the court – a hybrid of Cambodian and international laws – before the judges were sworn in, in 2006. The investigating judges were presented with the names of five possible suspects by the prosecution on July 18, 2007. On September 19, 2007 Nuon Chea, second in command of the Khmer Rouge and its most senior surviving member, was charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity. He faced Cambodian and foreign judges at the special genocide tribunal and was convicted on 7 August 2014 and received a life sentence. On July 26, 2010 Kang Kek Iew (aka Comrade Duch), director of the S-21 prison camp, was convicted of crimes against humanity and sentenced to 35 years' imprisonment. His sentence was reduced to 19 years, as he had already spent 11 years in prison. On February 2, 2012, his sentence was extended to life imprisonment by the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia.

Killing Fields - References - Netflix