Justice - Netflix

Set in Los Angeles, the entertainment and high-profile trial capital of the world, JUSTICE centers on four brilliant lawyers who, together, tackle the cases that captivate the country and provide compelling fodder for everything from water cooler chit-chat to tabloid glossies to 24-hour news channels. Combining their unique skill sets and personal charisma with the most cutting-edge forensic technology, these lawyers are a formidable presence in any courtroom. When the stakes are as high as they can be, you want Trott, Nicholson, Tuller & Graves in your corner.

When California's most prominent residents need the best legal representation, they hire TNT&G. Even if they are convicted in the eyes of the media, led by the infotainment court show "American Crime", TNT&G mounts a defense using state-of-the-art forensic interpretation, jury consultants, mock juries, experts and masterful media spin to save their clients -- no matter what the cost.

Ultimately, each episode will conclude with the series' signature epilogue. In a flashback to the scene of the crime, we see what no lawyer can ever see: what really happened, and whether JUSTICE has been served.

Justice - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2006-08-30

Justice - Lady Justice - Netflix

Lady Justice is an allegorical personification of the moral force in judicial systems. Her attributes are a blindfold, a balance, and a sword. She often appears as a pair with Prudentia, who holds a mirror and a snake. Lady Justice originates from the personification of Justice in Ancient Roman art known as Iustitia or Justitia after Latin: Iustitia, who is equivalent to the Greek goddesses Themis and Dike.

Justice - Blindfold - Netflix

Since the 16th century, Lady Justice has often been depicted wearing a blindfold. The blindfold represents impartiality, the ideal that justice should be applied without regard to wealth, power, or other status. The earliest Roman coins depicted Justitia with the sword in one hand and the scale in the other, but with her eyes uncovered. Justitia was only commonly represented as “blind” since about the end of the 15th century. The first known representation of blind Justice is Hans Gieng's 1543 statue on the Gerechtigkeitsbrunnen (Fountain of Justice) in Berne. Instead of using the Janus approach, many sculptures simply leave out the blindfold altogether. For example, atop the Old Bailey courthouse in London, a statue of Lady Justice stands without a blindfold; the courthouse brochures explain that this is because Lady Justice was originally not blindfolded, and because her “maidenly form” is supposed to guarantee her impartiality which renders the blindfold redundant. Another variation is to depict a blindfolded Lady Justice as a human scale, weighing competing claims in each hand. An example of this can be seen at the Shelby County Courthouse in Memphis, Tennessee. The cover of a 2006 issue of Rolling Stone proclaimed TIME TO GO!, focusing on the perceived corruption that dominated Congress. The drawing showed a bunch of figures evoking reactionary politics emerging from the Capitol. One of the figures was Lady Justice lifting her blindfold, implying that the then-composition of Congress had politicized the criminal justice system.

Justice - References - Netflix