Johnny Ringo - Netflix

Johnny Ringo was a Western series that aired on CBS from 1959-1960. It was loosely based on the life of the notorious gunfighter and outlaw, Johnny Ringo.

Ex-gunfighter Johnny Ringo is now the sheriff of a small Western town, who attempts to keep the peace with the aid of his deputy, Cully, and his girl, Laura Thomas.

Johnny Ringo - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 1959-10-01

Johnny Ringo - Ringo Starr - Netflix

Sir Richard Starkey (born 7 July 1940), known professionally as Ringo Starr, is an English musician, songwriter, singer, and actor who gained worldwide fame as the drummer for the Beatles. He occasionally sang lead vocals, usually for one song on an album, including “With a Little Help from My Friends”, “Yellow Submarine”, “Good Night”, and their cover of “Act Naturally”. He also wrote the Beatles' songs “Don't Pass Me By” and “Octopus's Garden”, and is credited as a co-writer of others, including “What Goes On” and “Flying”. Starr was twice afflicted by life-threatening illnesses during childhood, and he fell behind in school as a result of prolonged hospitalisations. In 1955, he entered the workforce and briefly held a position with British Rail before securing an apprenticeship at a Liverpool equipment manufacturer. Soon afterwards, he became interested in the UK skiffle craze and developed a fervent admiration for the genre. In 1957, he cofounded his first band, the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group, which earned several prestigious local bookings before the fad succumbed to American rock and roll by early 1958. When the Beatles were formed in 1960, Starr was a member of another Liverpool group, Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. After achieving moderate success with that band in the UK and Hamburg, he quit the Hurricanes and joined the Beatles in August 1962, when he replaced Pete Best. Starr played key roles in the Beatles' films and appeared in numerous others. After the band's break-up in 1970, he released several successful singles including the US number four hit “It Don't Come Easy”, and number ones “Photograph” and “You're Sixteen”. In 1972, he released his most successful UK single, “Back Off Boogaloo”, which peaked at number two. He achieved commercial and critical success with his 1973 album Ringo, which was a top ten release in both the UK and the US. He has been featured in a number of documentaries and hosted television shows. He also narrated the first two series of the children's television programme Thomas & Friends and portrayed “Mr Conductor” during the first season of the PBS children's television series Shining Time Station. Since 1989, he has toured with thirteen variations of Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band. Starr's creative contribution to music has received praise from other drummers such as Phil Collins, who described him as “a great musician”, and Steve Smith, who commented: “Before Ringo, drum stars were measured by their soloing ability and virtuosity. Ringo's popularity brought forth a new paradigm ... we started to see the drummer as an equal participant in the compositional aspect ... His parts are so signature to the songs that you can listen to a Ringo drum part without the rest of the music and still identify the song.” He was inducted into the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2011, Rolling Stone readers named Starr the fifth-greatest drummer of all time. Starr, who was previously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a Beatle in 1988, was inducted for his solo career in 2015, making him one of 21 performers inducted more than once. He was appointed a Knight Bachelor in the 2018 New Year Honours for services to music.

Johnny Ringo - 1970s - Netflix

Shortly before McCartney's announcement in April 1970, he and Starr fell out due to McCartney's refusal to cede the release date of his eponymous solo album to allow for Starr's debut, Sentimental Journey, and the Beatles' Let It Be. Starr's album – composed of renditions of pre-rock standards that included musical arrangements by Quincy Jones, Maurice Gibb, George Martin and McCartney – peaked at number seven in the UK and number 22 in the US. Starr followed Sentimental Journey with the country-inspired Beaucoups of Blues, engineered by Scotty Moore and featuring renowned Nashville session musician Pete Drake. Despite receiving some favourable reviews, the album failed to meet with commercial success. Starr subsequently combined his musical activities with developing a career as a film actor. Starr played drums on Lennon's John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band (1970), Ono's Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band (1970), and on Harrison's albums All Things Must Pass (1970), Living in the Material World (1973) and Dark Horse (1974). In 1971, Starr participated in the Concert for Bangladesh, organised by Harrison, and with him co-wrote the hit single “It Don't Come Easy”, which reached number four in both the US and the UK. The following year he released his most successful UK hit, “Back Off Boogaloo” (again produced and co-written by Harrison), which peaked at number two (US number nine). Having become friends with the English singer Marc Bolan, Starr made his directorial debut with the 1972 T. Rex documentary Born to Boogie. In 1973, Starr earned two number one hits in the US: “Photograph”, a UK number eight hit that he co-wrote with Harrison, and “You're Sixteen”, written by the Sherman Brothers. Starr's third million-selling single, “You're Sixteen” was released in the UK in February 1974 where it peaked at number four in the charts. Both songs appeared on Starr's debut rock album, Ringo, which was produced by Richard Perry and featured writing and musical contributions from Lennon, McCartney and Harrison. A commercial and critical success, the LP also included “Oh My My”, a US number five. The album reached number seven in the UK and number two in the US. Author Peter Doggett describes Ringo as a template for Starr's solo career, saying that, as a musician first rather than a songwriter, “he would rely on his friends and his charm, and if both were on tap, then the results were usually appealing.” Goodnight Vienna followed in 1974 and was also successful, reaching number eight in the US and number 30 in the UK. Featuring musical contributions from Lennon, Elton John and Harry Nilsson, the album included a cover of the Platters' “Only You (And You Alone)”, which peaked at number six in the US and number 28 in the UK, and Hoyt Axton's “No No Song”, which was a US number three and Starr's seventh consecutive top-ten hit. The John-written “Snookeroo” failed to chart in the UK, however, when issued there as the second single from the album. During this period Starr became romantically involved with Lynsey de Paul. He played tambourine on a song she wrote and produced for Vera Lynn, “Don't You Remember When”, and he inspired another De Paul song, “If I Don't Get You the Next One Will”, which she described as being about revenge after he missed a dinner appointment with her because he was asleep in his office. Starr founded the record label Ring O' Records in 1975. The company signed eleven artists and released fifteen singles and five albums between 1975 and 1978, including works by David Hentschel, Graham Bonnet and Rab Noakes. The commercial impact of Starr's own career diminished over the same period, however, although he continued to record and remained a familiar celebrity presence. Speaking in 2001, he attributed this downward turn to his “[not] taking enough interest” in music, saying of himself and friends such as Nilsson and Keith Moon: “We weren't musicians dabbling in drugs and alcohol; now we were junkies dabbling in music.” Starr, Nilsson and Moon were members of a drinking club, the Hollywood Vampires. In November 1976 Starr appeared as a guest at the Band's farewell concert, featured in the 1978 Martin Scorsese documentary The Last Waltz. Also in 1976, Starr issued Ringo's Rotogravure, the first release under his new contract with Atlantic Records for the North American market and Polydor for all other territories. The album was produced by Arif Mardin and featured compositions by Lennon, McCartney and Harrison. Starr promoted the release heavily, yet Rotogravure and its accompanying singles failed to chart in the UK. In America, the LP produced two minor hits, “A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll” (number 26) and a cover of “Hey! Baby” (number 74), and achieved moderate sales, reaching a chart position of 28. Its disappointing performance inspired Atlantic to revamp Starr's formula; the result was a curious blend of disco and 1970s pop, titled Ringo the 4th (1977). The album was a commercial disaster, failing to chart in the UK and peaking at number 162 in the US. In 1978 Starr released Bad Boy, which reached a disappointing number 129 in the US and again failed to place on the UK albums chart.

Johnny Ringo - References - Netflix