I'm Your Destiny - Netflix

I'd like you to think about it for a moment.

If Beethoven's parents didn't meet, he, much less his famous fifth symphony "Destiny," would have never existed.\ If the parents of Edison, Einstein, or Bill Gates didn't fall in love, what would the world today be like?\ Yes, in reality, there is certainly that special someone you must absolutely fall in love with--the person of your destiny.

A strange man who claims to be "god" suddenly reveals himself to 29-year-old lead character Makoto Masaki and declares, "You haven't realized it yet, but only a wall separates you from the one you must fall in love with, no matter what. The woman you're destined to be with works in the office next door."\ "Sounds like something out of a creepy dream. But..," wonders Makoto. Skeptical at first, he eventually decides to believe the prediction and just go for it.\ "Please don't be shocked. I'm your destiny," he tells fellow 29-year-old Haruko Kogetsu.\ "What?" she replies, before flat-out rejecting him. And that's where their love story begins.

Whether it's the beach they went to as children, their college entrance exam building, or the shrine where they offered prayers last New Year's, it's a miracle how the two have actually crossed paths countless times since they were little. Yet they don't know each other's name nor recognize each other's face. The greatest "destiny" story kicks off on the worst possible note.

I'm Your Destiny - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Japanese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-04-15

I'm Your Destiny - Destiny's Child - Netflix

Destiny's Child was an American girl group whose final and best-known line-up comprised Beyoncé Knowles, Kelly Rowland, and Michelle Williams. Formed in 1997 in Houston, Texas, Destiny's Child members began their musical career as Girl's Tyme, formed in 1990, comprising Knowles, Rowland, LaTavia Roberson, and LeToya Luckett among others. After years of limited success, the quartet were signed in 1997 to Columbia Records and Music World Entertainment as Destiny's Child. Destiny's Child was launched into mainstream recognition following the release of their best-selling second album, The Writing's on the Wall (1999), which contained the number-one singles “Bills, Bills, Bills” and “Say My Name”. Despite critical and commercial success, the group was plagued by internal conflict and legal turmoil, as Roberson and Luckett attempted to split from the group's manager Mathew Knowles, citing favoritism of Knowles and Rowland. In early 2000, both Roberson and Luckett were replaced with Williams and Farrah Franklin; however, Franklin quit after five months, leaving the group as a trio. Their third album, Survivor (2001), which contains themes the public interpreted as a channel to the group's experience, contains the worldwide hits “Independent Women”, “Survivor” and “Bootylicious”. In 2002, they announced a hiatus and re-united two years later for the release of their fourth and final studio album, Destiny Fulfilled (2004). Destiny's Child has sold more than sixty million records worldwide to date. Billboard magazine ranks the group as one of the greatest musical trios of all time, the ninth most successful artist/band of the 2000s, placed the group 68th in its All-Time Hot 100 Artists list in 2008 and in December 2016, the magazine ranked them as the 90th most successful dance club artist of all-time. The group was nominated for 14 Grammy Awards, winning twice for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals and once for Best R&B Song.

I'm Your Destiny - Legacy - Netflix

Destiny's Child have been referred to as R&B icons, and have sold more than 60 million records worldwide. Following the disbandment of Destiny's Child, MTV's James Montgomery noted that “they have left a fairly sizable legacy behind” as “one of the best-selling female pop vocal groups in history.” Billboard observed that Destiny's Child were “defined by a combination of feisty female empowerment anthems, killer dance moves and an enviable fashion sense,” while Essence noted that they “set trends with their harmonious music and cutting-edge style.” In 2015, Daisy Jones of Dazed Digital published an article on how the group made a significant impact in R&B music, writing “Without a hint of rose tint, Destiny's Child legitimately transformed the sound of R&B forever... their distinct influence can be found peppered all over today's pop landscape, from Tinashe to Ariana Grande.” Nicole Marrow of The Cut magazine believed that R&B music in the 1990s and early 2000s “was virtually redefined by the success of powerhouse performers like TLC and Destiny's Child, who preached a powerful litany of embracing womanhood and celebrating individuality.” Hugh McIntyre of Forbes wrote that before The Pussycat Dolls and Danity Kane burst onto the music scene in the mid-2000s, Destiny's Child were “the reigning queens” of the girl group genre. Destiny's Child's final line-up as a trio has been widely noted as the group's most recognizable and successful line-up. Billboard recognized them as one of the greatest musical trios of all time; they were also ranked as the third most successful girl group of all time on the Billboard charts, behind TLC and The Supremes. The group's single “Independent Women” (2000) ranked second on Billboard's list of the “Top 40 Biggest Girl Group Songs of All Time on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart”. “Independent Women” was also acknowledged by the Guinness World Records as the longest-running number-one song on the Hot 100 by a girl group. The term “Bootylicious” (a combination of the words booty and delicious) became popularized by Destiny's Child's single of the same and was later added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2006. The term was also used to describe Beyoncé during the 2000s decade due to her curvacious figure. VH1 included “Bootylicious” on their “100 Greatest Songs of the '00s” list in 2011, and Destiny's Child on their “100 Greatest Women in Music” list the following year. Additionally, “Independent Women” was ranked as one of NME's “100 Best Songs of the 00s”. Destiny's Child was honored at the 2005 World Music Awards with the World's Best Selling Female Group of All Time Award, which included a 17-minute tribute performance by Patti LaBelle, Usher, Babyface, Rihanna, Amerie and Teairra Mari. In 2006, the group was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Destiny's Child has been credited as a musical influence or inspiration by several artists including Rihanna, Meghan Trainor, Fifth Harmony, Little Mix, Girls Aloud, Haim, Jess Glynne, Katy B, and RichGirl. Ciara was inspired to pursue a career in music after seeing Destiny's Child perform on television. Ariana Grande cited Destiny's Child as one of her vocal inspirations, saying that listening to the group's music is how she discovered her range and “learned about harmonies and runs and ad-libs.” Meghan Trainor stated that her single “No” (2016) was inspired by the late 1990s and early 2000s sounds of Destiny's Child, NSYNC, and Britney Spears. Fifth Harmony cited Destiny's Child as their biggest inspiration, and even paid tribute to the group by performing a medley of “Say My Name”, “Independent Women”, “Bootylicious” and “Survivor” on the television show Greatest Hits. Fifth Harmony also incorporated elements of the intro from “Bootylicious” for the intro to their own song “Brave, Honest, Beautiful” (2015).

I'm Your Destiny - References - Netflix