Gunpowder - Netflix

Gunpowder is set in the year 1605 and chronicles the attempt made by Fawkes and a group of provincial English Catholics to blow up the House of Lords and kill King James I, all in an effort to help restore a Catholic to the crown. Among them was Robert Catesby, who was said to be the mastermind behind the operation. The plot was ultimately thwarted by authorities after explosives were spotted near Westminster Palace.

Gunpowder - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

Gunpowder - Gunpowder Empires - Netflix

The Gunpowder Empires were the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires. Each of these three empires had considerable military success using the newly developed firearms, especially cannon and small arms, in the course of their empires, but unlike Europe for example, the introduction of the gunpowder weapons prompted changes well beyond simply army organization.

Gunpowder - The Hodgson-McNeill concept - Netflix

first, a legitimization of independent dynastic law; second, the conception of the whole state as a single military force; third, the attempt to explain all economic and high cultural resources as appanages of the chief military families.

The phrase was coined by Marshall G.S. Hodgson and his colleague William H. McNeill at the University of Chicago. Hodgson used the phrase in the title of Book 5 (“The Second Flowering: The Empires of Gunpowder Times”) of his highly influential three-volume work, The Venture of Islam (1974). Hodgson saw gunpowder weapons as the key to the “military patronage states of the Later Middle Period” which replaced the unstable, geographically limited confederations of Turkic clans that prevailed in post-Mongol times. Hodgson defined a “military patronage state” as one having three characteristics:

Such states grew “out of Mongol notions of greatness,” but “[s]uch notions could fully mature and create stable bureaucratic empires only after gunpowder weapons and their specialized technology attained a primary place in military life.” McNeill argued that whenever such states “were able to monopolize the new artillery, central authorities were able to unite larger territories into new, or newly consolidated, empires.” Monopolization was key. Although Europe pioneered the development of the new artillery in the fifteenth century, no state monopolized it. Gun-casting know-how had been concentrated in the Low Countries near the mouths of the Scheldt and Rhine rivers. France and the Habsburgs divided those territories among themselves, resulting in an arms standoff. By contrast, such monopolies allowed states to create militarized empires in Western Asia, Russia and India, and “in a considerably modified fashion” in China and Japan.

Gunpowder - References - Netflix