Gameshow Marathon - Netflix

Gameshow Marathon features six celebrity contestants competing in a weekly elimination-style tournament in which they play different classic game shows during each episode. Future episodes include, "Beat the Clock", "Press Your Luck", "Card Sharks", "Match Game" and "Family Feud". A champion will be crowned at the end of the series. In addition, the program will include a viewer participation element whereby they will have a chance to win the celebrity's grand prize each episode through a wireless (text message) trivia game that enters viewers into a sweepstakes.

Type: Game Show

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2006-05-31

Gameshow Marathon - Press Your Luck - Netflix

Press Your Luck is an American television daytime game show created by Bill Carruthers and Jan McCormack. It premiered on CBS on September 19, 1983, and ended on September 26, 1986. In the show, contestants collected spins by answering trivia questions and then used the spins on an 18-space game board to win cash and prizes. The contestant who amassed the highest total in cash and prizes kept his/her winnings for the day and became the champion. Peter Tomarken was the show's host, and Rod Roddy was the primary announcer. John Harlan and Charlie O'Donnell filled in as substitute announcers for Roddy on different occasions. Press Your Luck was videotaped before a studio audience at CBS Television City, Studios 33 and 43, in Hollywood, California. The show was a retooling of the earlier Carruthers production Second Chance, which was hosted by Jim Peck and aired on ABC in 1977. The show was known for the “Whammy”, a red cartoon creature with a high-pitched, raspy voice. Landing on any Whammy space reset the contestant's score to zero, accompanied by an animation that showed the Whammy taking the loot, but frequently being chased away, blown up, or otherwise humiliated in the process. The Whammies were created and animated by Savage Steve Holland and Bill Kopp, and voiced by Carruthers. Approximately 85 different animations were used.

Gameshow Marathon - Board values - Netflix

In the first Big Board round, cash amounts ranged from $100 to $1,500 ($1,250 in the pilot and early episodes) and prizes typically were worth no more than $2,000. The second round featured cash amounts from $500 to $5,000, and prizes potentially worth $6,000 or more. Three rare but special squares also appeared throughout the course of the show. The first, Double Your $$, multiplied the contestant's dollar amount at the time by two. This square later became Double Your $$ + One Spin, awarding an extra spin in addition to the multiplied cash amount. Add-A-One added a “1” to the front of the contestant's current score (e.g., $0 became $10; $500 became $1,500; and $2,000 became $12,000). The third, $2000 or Lose-1-Whammy, offered the contestant a choice of adding $2,000 to his/her score ($2,000 was automatically added if the contestant had no Whammies), or removing a Whammy received earlier in the game. Add-A-One was only featured in the first Big Board round, with the others only appearing in the second Big Board round. One square present in both Big Board rounds was Big Bucks. This square, appearing third from the right in the bottom row, automatically moved the selector light to the corresponding position in the top row. The top dollar values in this square in round one were $1,000, $1,250 and $1,500 (Early episodes and Pilot: $750, $1,000, and $1,250.) For the second round, the top dollar values were $3,000, $4,000, and $5,000, all of which awarded an extra spin. In both rounds, the value of a prize was announced only after it had been claimed, and a new prize was put on the board in its place (the aforementioned Add-A-One and Double Your $$ [+ One Spin] spaces were also treated as prizes in this respect).

Gameshow Marathon - References - Netflix