Evil Up Close - Netflix

Meet the neighbour who waves politely, the friend who is the life and soul of a party, the colleague who buys the coffee. All are ready to kill, rape or harm. They live cheek by jowl with us; they look, sound and behave like us but they are evil and their crimes have shocked the world.

Evil Up Close hears from the people who knew, loved or trusted those hunted for vicious crimes, of those who lived alongside, laughed with or felt the warmth of a monster; the wives and daughters, husbands and sons, the friends, neighbours, detectives and prosecutors who have eye-balled evil in the dock.

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2012-05-15

Evil Up Close - Evil eye - Netflix

The evil eye is a curse or legend believed to be cast by a malevolent glare, usually given to a person when they are unaware. Many cultures believe that receiving the evil eye will cause misfortune or injury. Talismans created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called “evil eyes”. The idea expressed by the term causes many different cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, primarily in West Asia. The idea appears multiple times in Jewish rabbinic literature. It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures. Charms and decorations with eye-like symbols known as nazars, which are used to repel the evil eye, are a common sight across Armenia, Albania, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, Turkey, Israel, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Palestine, Morocco, southern Spain, Italy, Greece, the Levant, Afghanistan, Syria, and Mexico, and have become a popular choice of souvenir with tourists.

Evil Up Close - In Judaism - Netflix

The evil eye is mentioned several times in the classic Pirkei Avot (Ethics of Our Fathers). In Chapter II, five disciples of Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakai give advice on how to follow the good path in life and avoid the bad. Rabbi Eliezer says an evil eye is worse than a bad friend, a bad neighbor, or an evil heart. Judaism believes that a “good eye” designates an attitude of good will and kindness towards others. Someone who has this attitude in life will rejoice when his fellow man prospers; he will wish everyone well. An “evil eye” denotes the opposite attitude. A man with “an evil eye” will not only feel no joy but experience actual distress when others prosper, and will rejoice when others suffer. A person of this character represents a great danger to our moral purity. Many Observant Jews avoid talking about valuable items they own, good luck that has come to them and, in particular, their children. If any of these are mentioned, the speaker and/or listener will say “b'li ayin hara” (Hebrew), meaning “without an evil eye”, or “kein eina hara” (Yiddish; often shortened to “kennahara”), “no evil eye”. Another way to ward off the evil eye is to spit three times (or pretend to). Romans call this custom “despuere malum,” to spit at evil. It has also been suggested the 10th commandment: “do not covet anything that belongs to your neighbor” is a law against bestowing the evil eye on another person.

Evil Up Close - References - Netflix