Eat, Shop, Save - Netflix

Fronted by Ranvir Singh, alongside chef and nutritionist Dale Pinnock, finance guru Gemma Godfrey and fitness consultant Tom Pitfield, Eat, Shop, Save is a four-part consumer series.

In each episode, Ranvir sets families an eight-week challenge to get fitter, eat better, and save money on their shopping. In a time of rising inflation, with families feeling burned out, when weekly grocery budgets are being stretched by high prices at the checkouts, and with the UK being the second most obese country in Europe, Ranvir and her team of experts meet a new family each week, who are facing a range of issues.

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2017-07-13

Eat, Shop, Save - Little Shop of Horrors (film) - Netflix

Little Shop of Horrors is a 1986 American rock musical comedy horror film directed by Frank Oz. It is a film adaptation of the off-Broadway musical comedy of the same name by composer Alan Menken and writer Howard Ashman about a geeky florist shop worker who finds out his Venus flytrap can speak. Menken and Ashman's Off-Broadway musical was based on the low-budget 1960 film The Little Shop of Horrors, directed by Roger Corman. The 1986 film stars Rick Moranis, Ellen Greene, Vincent Gardenia, Steve Martin, and Levi Stubbs as the voice of Audrey II. The film also featured special appearances by Jim Belushi, John Candy, Christopher Guest and Bill Murray. It was produced by David Geffen through The Geffen Company and released by Warner Bros. on December 19, 1986. Little Shop of Horrors was filmed on the Albert R. Broccoli 007 Stage at the Pinewood Studios in England, where a “downtown” set, complete with overhead train track, was constructed. Produced on a budget of $25 million, in contrast to the original 1960 film, which, according to Corman, only cost $30,000, it was well received by critics and audiences alike, eventually developing a cult following. The film's original 23-minute finale, based on the musical's ending, was rewritten and reshot after test audiences did not react positively to it. For years only available as black-and-white workprint footage, the original ending was fully restored in 2012 by Warner Home Video.

Eat, Shop, Save - Critical reception - Netflix

Rotten Tomatoes retrospectively collected reviews to give it a score of 90% based on reviews from 48 critics, the general consensus states: “Remixing Roger Corman's B-movie by way of the Off-Broadway musical, Little Shop of Horrors offers camp, horror and catchy tunes in equal measure—plus some inspired cameos by the likes of Steve Martin and Bill Murray.” On Metacritic, which uses an average of critics' reviews, the film has an 81% rating based on 15 reviews, indicating “universal acclaim” (14 positive reviews, 1 mixed, and no negative). Richard Corliss of Time magazine said, “You can try not liking this adaptation of the Off-Broadway musical hit -- it has no polish and a pushy way with a gag -- but the movie sneaks up on you, about as subtly as Audrey II.” In The New York Times, Janet Maslin called it “a full-blown movie musical, and quite a winning one”. Roger Ebert said in his review: “All of the wonders of Little Shop of Horrors are accomplished with an offhand, casual charm. This is the kind of movie that cults are made of, and after Little Shop finishes its first run, I wouldn't be at all surprised to see it develop as one of those movies that fans want to include in their lives”. Oz's friend and Muppet colleague Jim Henson praised the film and said “the lip sync on the plant in that film is just absolutely amazing”.

Eat, Shop, Save - References - Netflix