Dangerous Borders: A Journey across India & Pakistan - Netflix

Journalists and presenting talent Adnan Sarwar and Babita Sharma travel either side of the contentious Indo-Pakistan border.

From Gujarat and Sindh to the volatile and fiercely-contested Kashmir and Northern Territories, they cross landscapes of extraordinary variety and often staggering beauty.

On their journey the pair discover enduring traditions, surprising religious diversity and unexpected flashes of modernity in the countries of their respective parents' birth. The shadow of Partition hangs over both, but where do these two mighty nations stand in the 21st century?

Dangerous Borders: A Journey across India & Pakistan - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-08-14

Dangerous Borders: A Journey across India & Pakistan - History of Pakistan - Netflix

The history of Pakistan encompasses the history of the region constituting modern-day Pakistan. For over three millennia, the region has witnessed human activity and one of the world's major civilizations, the Indus Valley Civilisation. The trade routes which traverse the Indus Valley linking Central Asia, the Indian subcontinent and the Orient have attracted people from as far as Greece and Mongolia and several imperial powers, the last being the British Empire.

Dangerous Borders: A Journey across India & Pakistan - Early period of Pakistan Movement - Netflix

In 1877, Syed Ameer Ali had formed the Central National Muhammadan Association to work towards the political advancement of the Indian Muslims, who had suffered grievously in 1857, in the aftermath of the failed Sepoy Mutiny against the East India Company; the British were seen as foreign invaders. But the organization declined towards the end of the 19th century.

In 1885, the Indian National Congress was founded as a forum, which later became a party, to promote a nationalist cause. Although the Congress attempted to include the Muslim community in the struggle for independence from the British rule – and some Muslims were very active in the Congress – the majority of Muslim leaders did not trust the party. A turning point came in 1900, when the British administration in the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh acceded to Hindu demands and made Hindi, the version of the Hindustani language written in the Devanagari script, the official language. The proselytisation conducted in the region by the activists of a new Hindu reformist movement also stirred Muslim's concerns about their faith. Eventually, the Muslims feared that the Hindu majority would seek to suppress the rights of Muslims in the region following the departure of the British.

Dangerous Borders: A Journey across India & Pakistan - References - Netflix