Costa! - Netflix

Costa! - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Dutch

Status: Ended

Runtime: None minutes

Premier: 2001-10-01

Costa! - Costa Concordia disaster - Netflix

The Italian cruise ship Costa Concordia capsized after striking an underwater rock off Isola del Giglio, Tuscany, on 13 January 2012, resulting in 32 deaths. There may have been additional people not listed as on board, so the death toll could possibly be higher. The search for bodies was canceled at the end of January and resumed after the parbuckling manoeuvre in September 2013, after which additional remains were found. On 26 September 2013, remains were found on deck 4, and were reported as being the two passengers reported as missing. The following day, the remains were found not to be from the missing passengers. In October 2013, the body of one of the missing passengers was found and confirmed to be that of Maria Grazia Trecarichi. Scuba divers had discovered her body near the third deck of the salvaged ship. The eight year old Costa Cruises vessel was on the first leg of a cruise around the Mediterranean Sea when she deviated from her planned route at the Isola del Giglio, sailed closer to the island, and struck a rock formation on the sea floor. A six-hour rescue effort resulted in most of the passengers being brought ashore. An investigation focused on shortcomings in the procedures followed by the crew and the actions of the Italian captain, who allegedly left the ship prematurely. About 300 passengers were left on board, most of whom were rescued by helicopter or motorboats in the area. Captain Francesco Schettino was later found guilty of manslaughter in connection with the disaster and sentenced to sixteen years in prison. Despite receiving its own share of criticism, Costa Cruises did not face criminal charges. Costa Concordia was officially declared a “constructive total loss” by the insurance company, and her salvage was “one of the biggest maritime salvage operations”. On 16 September 2013, the parbuckle salvage of the ship began, and by the early hours of 17 September 2013, the wreck was set upright on its underwater cradle. In July 2014, the ship was refloated by large sponsons (metal tanks) welded to its sides and was towed 320 kilometres (200 miles) to its home port of Genoa for scrapping which was finished in July 2017. The total cost of the disaster, including victims' compensation, refloating, towing and scrapping costs, is estimated at approximately $2 billion, more than three times the $612 million construction cost of the ship. Costa Cruises offered compensation to passengers (to a limit of €11,000 a person) to pay for all damages, including the value of the cruise. 65% of the survivors took the offer.

Costa! - In Italy - Netflix

Newspaper Corriere della Sera stated that Italy owed the world a “convincing explanation” for the wreck and called for harsh punishment of those found responsible. Il Giornale said the wreck was a “global disaster for Italy”. Il Messaggero said there was “anguish over those still missing”. La Repubblica called the event “a night of errors and lies”. La Stampa criticised the captain for not raising the alarm and refusing to go back on board the ship. Italian commentators reflected on the contrast between Schettino and De Falco and what it said about the national character. They represented “the two souls of Italy”, according to Aldo Grasso in Corriere della Sera. “On the one hand a man hopelessly lost, a coward who shirks his responsibility as a man and an officer, indelibly stained. The other grasps the seriousness of the situation immediately and tries to remind the first of his obligations.” Some saw parallels between the incident and the country's recent political upheavals. “To see someone that in a moment of difficulty maintains steady nerves is consoling because that is what we need”, another Corriere della Sera columnist, Beppe Severgnini, told The New York Times. “Italy wants to have steady nerves because we've already done the cabaret route.” De Falco's exasperated order to Schettino, “Vada a bordo, cazzo!” became a catchphrase in Italy. T-shirts with the phrase were soon printed and sold across the country. It has also been used on Twitter and Facebook.

Costa! - References - Netflix