Australia Doesn't Just Want to Kill You - Netflix

Humans have long looked to nature's sophisticated biological systems for technological inspiration, from mimicking birds and engineering flight, to copying plant burrs and inventing Velcro. In Australia the natural world is equally inspiring, it just so happens that most of it could kill us. In Australia Doesn't Just Want to Kill You, we look at some of the extraordinary and extraordinarily deadly Aussie wildlife that, with a little ingenuity, are proving as helpful as they are harmful.

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2016-04-06

Australia Doesn't Just Want to Kill You - The Marshall Mathers LP - Netflix

The Marshall Mathers LP is the third studio album by American rapper Eminem, released on May 23, 2000 by Aftermath Entertainment and Interscope Records. The album was produced mostly by Dr. Dre and Eminem, along with The 45 King, the Bass Brothers, and Mel-Man. It was recorded over a two-month period in several studios in the Detroit area, and during this time, Eminem felt significant pressure to improve upon the success of his previous record. Released a year after Eminem's breakout album The Slim Shady LP, the album features more introspective lyricism including the rapper's response to his sudden rise to fame and controversy surrounding his lyrics. Musically, the album has been associated with the genres of hardcore hip-hop and horrorcore. In addition to his relationship with fame, the rapper also discusses his relationship with wife Kim Mathers and his mother, who are both negatively depicted throughout the album. Like The Slim Shady LP, The Marshall Mathers LP was surrounded by significant controversy upon its release. Criticism centered around lyrics that were considered violent, homophobic, and misogynistic. Lynne Cheney criticized the lyrics at United States Senate hearing, while the Canadian government considered refusing Eminem's entry into the country. Despite the controversy, the record received acclaim from critics, who praised the rapper's lyrical ability and emotional depth. Retrospectively, the album has appeared on several lists of the greatest albums of all time. The album sold more than 1.78 million copies in the US in its first week alone, becoming the fastest-selling studio album by any solo artist in American music history at that time. In 2001, the album won the Grammy Award for Best Rap Album and was nominated for Album of the Year, losing the latter to Steely Dan's Two Against Nature. The album was certified Diamond by the Recording Industry Association of America in March 2011 for shipping 10 million copies in the United States. By December 2016, the album had sold over 11 million copies in the United States and over 21 million copies worldwide. A sequel to the album titled The Marshall Mathers LP 2 was released on November 5, 2013.

Australia Doesn't Just Want to Kill You - Recording - Netflix

The Marshall Mathers LP was recorded in a two-month-long “creative binge”, which often involved 20-hour-long studio sessions. Eminem hoped to keep publicity down during the recording in order to stay focused on working and figuring out how to “map out” each song. He described himself as a “studio rat” who benefited creatively from the isolated environment of the studio. Much of the album was written spontaneously in the studio; Dr. Dre noted, “We don't wake up at two in the morning, call each other, and say, 'I have an idea. We gotta get to the studio.' We just wait and see what happens when we get there.” Eminem observed that much of his favorite material on the album evolved from “fucking around” in the studio; “Marshall Mathers” developed from the rapper watching Jeff Bass casually strumming a guitar, while “Criminal” was based on a piano riff Eminem overheard Bass playing in studio next door. “Kill You” was written when Eminem heard the track playing in the background while talking to Dr. Dre on the phone and developed an interest in using it for a song. He then wrote the lyrics at home and met up with Dr. Dre and the two recorded the song together. “Kim” was the first song the rapper recorded for the album, shortly after finishing work on The Slim Shady LP in late 1998. Eminem wrote “Kim” at a time in which he and his wife were separated, and he had just watched a romantic movie alone at a theater. Originally intending to write a love song for her while using ecstasy, the rapper hoped to avoid overt sentimentality and thus began writing a song of hate. With the track, the rapper aimed to create a short horror story in the form of a song. Once the couple reconciled, Eminem recalls, “I asked her to tell me what she thought of it. I remember my dumb ass saying, 'I know this is a fucked-up song, but it shows how much I care about you. To even think about you this much. To even put you on a song like this'.” The song “Stan” was produced by The 45 King. Eminem's manager, Paul Rosenberg, sent Eminem a tape of the producer's beats, and the second track featured a sample of English singer-songwriter Dido's “Thank You”. Upon hearing the song's lyrics, Eminem felt they described an obsessed fan, which became the inspiration for the song. The writing process for “Stan” differed greatly from Eminem's usual strategy, in which song concepts form during the writing: "'Stan' was one of the few songs that I actually sat down and had everything mapped out for. I knew what it was going to be about. " Dido later heard “Stan” and enjoyed it, and observed, “I got this letter out of the blue one day. It said, 'We like your album, we've used this track. Hope you don't mind, and hope you like it.' When they sent ['Stan'] to me and I played it in my hotel room, I was like, 'Wow! This track's amazing.'” The record label speculated that Eminem would be the first artist to sell one million copies in an album's first week of release. These expectations placed a large burden on Eminem, who recalled, “I was scared to death. I wanted to be successful, but before anything, I want respect.” After the album was finished, the record label felt that there were no songs that had potential to be a lead single. Feeling pressured, Eminem returned to the studio and wrote “The Way I Am” as his way of saying, “Look, this is the best I can do. I can't give you another 'My Name Is.' I can't just sit in there and make that magic happen.” However, after the song was added to the album, Eminem felt the urge to write another song, and gave a hook to Dr. Dre for him to create a beat, and went home to write new lyrics; the song eventually became “The Real Slim Shady”. The song also discusses Eminem killing Dr. Dre. The producer reflected, “It was funny to me. As long as it's hot, let's roll with it ... in my opinion, the crazier it is the better. Let's have fun with it and excite people.”

Australia Doesn't Just Want to Kill You - References - Netflix