Animal Underworld - Netflix

Henry Rollins explores the complex relationship between humans and animals by investigating dangerous and seemingly taboo practices around the world.

Animal Underworld - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2012-05-28

Animal Underworld - Henry Rollins - Netflix

Henry Lawrence Garfield (born February 13, 1961), better known by his stage name Henry Rollins, is an American musician, actor, writer, television and radio host, and comedian. He hosts a weekly radio show on KCRW, and is a regular columnist for Rolling Stone Australia and was a regular columnist for LA Weekly. After performing in the short-lived Washington, D.C. band State of Alert in 1980, Rollins fronted the California hardcore punk band Black Flag from August 1981 until mid-1986. Following the band's breakup, Rollins established the record label and publishing company 2.13.61 to release his spoken word albums, and formed the Rollins Band, which toured with a number of lineups from 1987 until 2003, and during 2006. Since Black Flag disbanded, Rollins has hosted numerous radio shows, such as Harmony in My Head on Indie 103, and television shows such as The Henry Rollins Show, MTV's 120 Minutes, and Jackass. He had recurring dramatic roles in the second season of Sons of Anarchy, in the final seasons of the animated series The Legend of Korra as Zaheer, and has also had roles in several films. Rollins has campaigned for various political causes in the United States, including promoting LGBT rights, World Hunger Relief, the West Memphis Three and an end to war in particular. As of 2013, Rollins became the host of the educational history television series 10 Things You Don't Know About, joining the show for its second and third seasons.

Animal Underworld - Musical style - Netflix

As a vocalist, Rollins has adopted a number of styles through the years. He was noted in the Washington, D.C. hardcore scene for what journalist Michael Azerrad described as a “compelling, raspy howl.” With State of Alert, Rollins “spat out the lyrics like a bellicose auctioneer.” He adopted a similar style after joining Black Flag in 1981. By their album Damaged, however, Black Flag began to incorporate a swing beat into their style. Rollins then abandoned his State of Alert “bark” and adopted the band's swing. Rollins later explained: “What I was doing kind of matched the vibe of the music. The music was intense and, well, I was as intense as you needed.” In both incarnations of the Rollins Band, Rollins combined spoken word with his traditional vocal style in songs such as “Liar” (the song begins with a one-minute spoken diatribe by Rollins), barked his way through songs (such as “Tearing” and “Starve”), and employed the loud-quiet dynamic. Rolling Stone's Anthony DeCurtis names Rollins a “screeching hate machine” and his “hallmark” as “the sheets-of-sound assault”. With the Rollins Band, his lyrics focused “almost exclusively on issues relating to personal integrity,” according to critic Geoffrey Welchman.

Animal Underworld - References - Netflix